The impact of religiosity on suicidal ideation among youth in central Mexico

Steven Hoffman, Flavio Marsiglia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although over 100 years of research has been dedicated to understanding the connection between religiosity and suicide, many questions still remain. This is especially true among adolescent populations in countries outside the US. In 2008, over 700 students attending eight alternative high school centers in central Mexico completed a health survey designed to provide a comprehensive overview of their physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional health. This article reports on the findings of a secondary analysis study of those data and focuses on the protective influence of religiosity on suicidal ideation. The findings of this study are discussed in light of the network theory's assertion that there is a belonging aspect to religion, and also to the idea that in religiously homogeneous communities of Mexico, religion can have a protective effect on the suicidal ideation of its members.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)255-266
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

Fingerprint

Suicidal Ideation
Religion
Mexico
Health Surveys
Suicide
Students
Health
Research
Population
Religiosity
Physical
Secondary Analysis
Network Theory
High School
Emotion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The impact of religiosity on suicidal ideation among youth in central Mexico. / Hoffman, Steven; Marsiglia, Flavio.

In: Journal of Religion and Health, Vol. 53, No. 1, 01.02.2014, p. 255-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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