The impact of rainfall frequency on coca (Etythrozylum coca) production in the Chapare region of Bolivia

M. S. McGlade, R. Henkel, Randall Cerveny

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study shows that the production of Bolivian coca leaves is highly linked to the frequency of rainfall events and, to a lesser degree, total precipitation. Temperature variability appears not to be related to production during the high sun rainy season. The relationship between rainfall frequency and coca leaf production is negative in that as the number of days of rainfall increases, the volume of harvested and dried leaves sent to market decreases. This study suggests that a critical factor in coca leaf production related to climate may be the ability of farmers to harvest and dry coca leaves, which is dependent on the regular occurrence of dry periods. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationYearbook - Conference of Latin Americanist Geographers
Pages97-105
Number of pages9
Volume20
StatePublished - 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

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    McGlade, M. S., Henkel, R., & Cerveny, R. (1994). The impact of rainfall frequency on coca (Etythrozylum coca) production in the Chapare region of Bolivia. In Yearbook - Conference of Latin Americanist Geographers (Vol. 20, pp. 97-105)