The impact of on-officer video cameras on police–citizen contacts: findings from a controlled experiment in Mesa, AZ

Justin T. Ready, Jacob Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: On-officer video camera (OVC) technology in policing is developing at a rapid pace. Large agencies are beginning to adopt the technology on a limited basis, and a number of cities across the United States have required their police departments to adopt the technology for all first responders. However, researchers have just begun to examine the effects of OVC technology on citizen complaints, officers’ attitudes, and police–citizen contacts. Methods: This study examines officer behavior and perceptions of camera technology among 100 line officers in the Mesa Police Department during police–citizen encounters over a 10-month period. Experimental data from 3698 field contact reports were analyzed to determine whether being assigned to wear an OVC influences officer behavior and perceptions of OVC technology. Results: Bivariate and multilevel logistic regression analyses indicate that officers assigned to wear a camera were less likely to perform stop-and-frisks and make arrests, but were more likely to give citations and initiate encounters. Officers were also more likely to report OVCs as being helpful if they wore a camera and in situations where they issued a warning or citation, performed a stop-and-frisk, and made an arrest. Conclusions: Our results provide important insights into the consequences of OVCs on police behavior and suggest that officers are more proactive with this technology without increasing their use of invasive strategies that may threaten the legitimacy of the organization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-458
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Experimental Criminology
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 14 2015

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Keywords

  • Body-worn cameras
  • Multilevel modeling
  • On-officer video cameras
  • Police accountability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law

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