The impact of interprofessional education on family nurse practitioner students' and family medicine residents' knowledge and confidence in screening for breast and cervical cancer

Cindy Weston, Marvellous Akinlotan, Anna Lichorad, David McClellan, Janet Helduser, Chinedum Ojinnaka, Benny Holland, Jane N. Bolin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and Purpose: This study determined the impact of an interprofessional education (IPE) simulation on family nurse practitioner (FNP) students' and family medicine residents' (FMRs) self-reported confidence in counseling women reluctant to engage in cancer screening or evaluation and assessed knowledge of breast and cervical cancer risk factors. Method: A multi-item knowledge survey on breast and cervical cancer risk factors was administered to 76 FNP students and FMRs followed by an IPE simulation with a pre-/postsurvey of self-reported confidence in counseling a woman reluctant to have breast and cervical cancer screening and evaluation. Discussion: Data demonstrated knowledge deficits in breast and cervical cancer risk factors in both disciplines with the average risk factor knowledge score of 8.5/12 for breast cancer and 7.8/12 for cervical cancer. Following IPE simulation, confidence in counseling women reluctant to have breast or cervical cancer screening improved across both disciplines (p < .05) and debrief feedback findings suggest improved attitudes toward collegiality, communication, and understanding of other interprofessional roles among both disciplines. Conclusion: Knowledge gaps exist among both FNP students and FMRs in breast and cervical cancer risk factors. This study suggests IPE simulation is effective in building individual provider confidence and team collegiality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)511-518
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners
Volume30
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Family Nurse Practitioners
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Medicine
Breast Neoplasms
Students
Education
Early Detection of Cancer
Counseling
Communication

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Cervical cancer
  • Confidence
  • Interprofessional education
  • Knowledge
  • Simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

The impact of interprofessional education on family nurse practitioner students' and family medicine residents' knowledge and confidence in screening for breast and cervical cancer. / Weston, Cindy; Akinlotan, Marvellous; Lichorad, Anna; McClellan, David; Helduser, Janet; Ojinnaka, Chinedum; Holland, Benny; Bolin, Jane N.

In: Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, Vol. 30, No. 9, 01.01.2018, p. 511-518.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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