The impact of distributive and procedural justice on correctional staff job stress, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment

Eric G. Lambert, Nancy L. Hogan, Marie L. Griffin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

164 Scopus citations

Abstract

Correctional staff are the heart and soul of any correctional facility. While there was a significant body of research on the impact of the work environment on correctional staff, this study sought to expand that knowledge by examining the effects of distributive and procedural justice on correctional staff job stress, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment. Multivariate models were estimated. Both forms of organizational justice had negative effects on job stress and organizational commitment; however, only procedural justice, but not distributive justice, had a significant impact on job satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)644-656
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Criminal Justice
Volume35
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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