The impact of cookstove adoption and replacement on fuelwood savings

Nathan Johnson, Kenneth M. Bryden

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Cookstove adoption and cookstove use are two conditions that are not commonly considered when comparing the cost and benefit of rural energy options. This study uses field data on improved cookstoves implemented in a rural West African village to estimate the impact of alternative cooking options prevalent today. Because approximately one-half of women own more than one cookstove, and use each of the stoves, it is unlikely that any single cookstove option will replace the three-stone fire. If current cooking trends are maintained, the fuelwood savings of village-wide implementation would thus be a mere 6.4% of the rated cookstove savings for a small single-burner cookstove that is partially adopted and only used for some cooking tasks. Even if the small single-burner cookstove was used for all meals less than the observed maximum cooking capacity of 18 kg, this village-wide savings would only amount to one-third of the rated cookstove fuelwood savings. The derated fuelwood savings based on stove stacking is expected to more closely approximate the realized fuelwood savings of a cookstove program rather than the idealized case of 100% adoption and 100% replacement. Additional discussion on investment impact-fuelwood displaced per dollar invested-is provided for four cookstove options. The high investment impact of the artisan improved cookstove and the next generation single-pot cookstove suggests they be chosen for implementation, yet the long lifetime of the institutional cookstove may be an attractive option for one-time funders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - 2012 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2012
Pages387-391
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
Event2nd IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2012 - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: Oct 21 2012Oct 24 2012

Other

Other2nd IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2012
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period10/21/1210/24/12

Fingerprint

Cooking
savings
Stoves
Fuel burners
village
Fires
meals
dollar
energy
Costs
trend
costs

Keywords

  • rural energy; sub-Saharan Africa; village; stovestacking; stove adoption; wood consumption

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Johnson, N., & Bryden, K. M. (2012). The impact of cookstove adoption and replacement on fuelwood savings. In Proceedings - 2012 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2012 (pp. 387-391). [6387081] https://doi.org/10.1109/GHTC.2012.56

The impact of cookstove adoption and replacement on fuelwood savings. / Johnson, Nathan; Bryden, Kenneth M.

Proceedings - 2012 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2012. 2012. p. 387-391 6387081.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Johnson, N & Bryden, KM 2012, The impact of cookstove adoption and replacement on fuelwood savings. in Proceedings - 2012 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2012., 6387081, pp. 387-391, 2nd IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2012, Seattle, WA, United States, 10/21/12. https://doi.org/10.1109/GHTC.2012.56
Johnson N, Bryden KM. The impact of cookstove adoption and replacement on fuelwood savings. In Proceedings - 2012 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2012. 2012. p. 387-391. 6387081 https://doi.org/10.1109/GHTC.2012.56
Johnson, Nathan ; Bryden, Kenneth M. / The impact of cookstove adoption and replacement on fuelwood savings. Proceedings - 2012 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2012. 2012. pp. 387-391
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