The impact of acculturation on informal and formal volunteering of Korean Americans in the United States

Hee Soun Jang, Lili Wang, Carlton F. Yoshioka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the impact of acculturation on Korean Americans’ decisions to volunteer either for secular and religious organizations or informally. The results show that language difficulty and Korean identity lower the likelihood of secular volunteering, but not of informal volunteering. Koreans who are Protestants or Catholics, and those with higher levels of education, are more likely to volunteer formally, but not informally. The findings indicate formal volunteering is strongly associated with acculturation factors, along with personal and social variables but informal volunteering appears to be independent from and not complementary of the other two types of volunteering.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-47
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Public and Nonprofit Affairs
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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acculturation
level of education
language
Acculturation
Volunteering
Volunteers

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Formal Volunteering
  • Informal Volunteering
  • Korean Americans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Business and International Management
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The impact of acculturation on informal and formal volunteering of Korean Americans in the United States. / Jang, Hee Soun; Wang, Lili; Yoshioka, Carlton F.

In: Journal of Public and Nonprofit Affairs, Vol. 2, No. 1, 01.03.2016, p. 31-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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