The impact of a middle school program to reduce aggression, victimization, and sexual violence

Dorothy L. Espelage, Sabina Low, Joshua R. Polanin, Eric C. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the impact of the Second Step: Student Success Through Prevention (SS-SSTP) Middle School Program on reducing youth violence including peer aggression, peer victimization, homophobic name calling, and sexual violence perpetration and victimization among middle school sixth-grade students. Methods: The study design was a nested cohort (sixth graders) longitudinal study. We randomly assigned 18 matched pairs of 36 middle schools to the SS-SSTP or control condition. Teachers implemented 15 weekly lessons of the sixth-grade curriculum that focused on social emotional learning skills, including empathy, communication, bully prevention, and problem-solving skills. All sixth graders (n = 3,616) in intervention and control conditions completed self-report measures assessing verbal/relational bullying, physical aggression, homophobic name calling, and sexual violence victimization and perpetration before and after the implementation of the sixth-grade curriculum. Results: Multilevel analyses revealed significant intervention effects with regard to physical aggression. The adjusted odds ratio indicated that the intervention effect was substantial; individuals in intervention schools were 42% less likely to self-report physical aggression than students in control schools. We found no significant intervention effects for verbal/relational bully perpetration, peer victimization, homophobic teasing, and sexual violence. Conclusions: Within a 1-year period, we noted significant reductions in self-reported physical aggression in the intervention schools. Results suggest that SS-SSTP holds promise as an efficacious prevention program to reduce physical aggression in adolescent youth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-186
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume53
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

Fingerprint

Crime Victims
Sex Offenses
Aggression
Bullying
Students
Curriculum
Self Report
Names
Multilevel Analysis
Violence
Longitudinal Studies
Odds Ratio
Communication
Learning

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Middle schools
  • Randomized clinical trial
  • Social-emotional learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The impact of a middle school program to reduce aggression, victimization, and sexual violence. / Espelage, Dorothy L.; Low, Sabina; Polanin, Joshua R.; Brown, Eric C.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 53, No. 2, 08.2013, p. 180-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Espelage, Dorothy L. ; Low, Sabina ; Polanin, Joshua R. ; Brown, Eric C. / The impact of a middle school program to reduce aggression, victimization, and sexual violence. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2013 ; Vol. 53, No. 2. pp. 180-186.
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