The identification of speech in noise by cochlear implant patients and normal-hearing listeners using 6-channel signal processors

Michael Dorman, Philipos C. Loizou, Jeanette Fitzke

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    37 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: To compare the recognition of vowels and sentences in noise by cochlear implant patients using a 6-channel, continuous interleaved sampling (CIS) processor and by normal-hearing subjects listening to speech processed in the manner of the implant processor and output as six amplitude- modulated sine waves. Design: Subjects, 11 normal-hearing listeners and 7 cochlear implant patients, were presented natural vowels produced by men, women, and girls in /hVd/ context and sentences from the Hearing In Noise Test (HINT) lists at +15, +10, and +5 dB signal to noise ratio (SNR) for identification. Stimuli for the normal-hearing subjects were preprocessed through a simulation of a 6-channel implant processor and were output as the sum of sinusoids at the center frequencies of the analysis filters. Results: For the multitalker vowels, four of the seven patients achieved scores within ±1 standard deviation of the mean for normal-hearing listeners at +15 and +10 dB SNR. At the +5 dB SNR three patients achieved scores within ± 1 standard deviation of the mean for the normal-hearing listeners. For the HINT sentences, four of seven patients achieved scores within ±1 standard deviation of the mean for the normal-hearing listeners at +15 dB and at +10 dB SNR and two achieved scores within that range at +5 dB SNR. Conclusion: Our results extend the range of stimulus conditions, from quiet to modest amounts of noise, in which the CIS strategy allows the best performing patients to extract most, if not all, of the information available to normal- hearing subjects listening to speech processed into six channels.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)481-484
    Number of pages4
    JournalEar and Hearing
    Volume19
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 1998

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    Cochlear Implants
    Hearing
    Noise
    Signal-To-Noise Ratio

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Otorhinolaryngology

    Cite this

    The identification of speech in noise by cochlear implant patients and normal-hearing listeners using 6-channel signal processors. / Dorman, Michael; Loizou, Philipos C.; Fitzke, Jeanette.

    In: Ear and Hearing, Vol. 19, No. 6, 12.1998, p. 481-484.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Dorman, Michael ; Loizou, Philipos C. ; Fitzke, Jeanette. / The identification of speech in noise by cochlear implant patients and normal-hearing listeners using 6-channel signal processors. In: Ear and Hearing. 1998 ; Vol. 19, No. 6. pp. 481-484.
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