The hysteresis effect on surface-air temperature relationship and its implications to urban planning: An examination in Phoenix, Arizona, USA

Jiyun Song, Zhihua Wang, Soe Myint, Chuyuan Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Urban areas, with massive built-up landscapes and manmade structures, have different patterns of local microclimate as compared to natural terrains. A better understanding of the surface-air temperature relationship in urban environments is of significant importance in interpreting urban climatic characteristics and solving related environmental problems via sustainable landscape planning strategies. In this study, we analyse the ground-based in-situ measurements as well as remotely sensed thermal dataset in Phoenix, AZ. Prominent hysteresis effect manifests in correlating diurnal cycles of surface and near-surface air temperatures. In particular, a peculiar pattern of “8-shaped” surface-air temperature hysteresis is observed over concrete pavement especially in winters. Pearson's r values, measuring the strength of surface-air temperature coupling, show strong correlation with incoming solar radiation and wind speed, but are relatively insensitive to humidity. The hysteresis effect diminishes at climatic scale, such that the remotely sensed surface temperature can be approximated as linearly correlated to the near-surface air temperature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)198-211
Number of pages14
JournalLandscape and Urban Planning
Volume167
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

hysteresis
urban planning
surface temperature
air temperature
manmade structure
landscape planning
landscape structure
microclimate
pavement
in situ measurement
effect
solar wind
solar radiation
humidity
urban area
wind velocity
winter

Keywords

  • Hysteresis effect
  • Remote sensing
  • Sensor network
  • Surface-air temperature relationship
  • Urban climate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

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title = "The hysteresis effect on surface-air temperature relationship and its implications to urban planning: An examination in Phoenix, Arizona, USA",
abstract = "Urban areas, with massive built-up landscapes and manmade structures, have different patterns of local microclimate as compared to natural terrains. A better understanding of the surface-air temperature relationship in urban environments is of significant importance in interpreting urban climatic characteristics and solving related environmental problems via sustainable landscape planning strategies. In this study, we analyse the ground-based in-situ measurements as well as remotely sensed thermal dataset in Phoenix, AZ. Prominent hysteresis effect manifests in correlating diurnal cycles of surface and near-surface air temperatures. In particular, a peculiar pattern of “8-shaped” surface-air temperature hysteresis is observed over concrete pavement especially in winters. Pearson's r values, measuring the strength of surface-air temperature coupling, show strong correlation with incoming solar radiation and wind speed, but are relatively insensitive to humidity. The hysteresis effect diminishes at climatic scale, such that the remotely sensed surface temperature can be approximated as linearly correlated to the near-surface air temperature.",
keywords = "Hysteresis effect, Remote sensing, Sensor network, Surface-air temperature relationship, Urban climate",
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AU - Song, Jiyun

AU - Wang, Zhihua

AU - Myint, Soe

AU - Wang, Chuyuan

PY - 2017/11/1

Y1 - 2017/11/1

N2 - Urban areas, with massive built-up landscapes and manmade structures, have different patterns of local microclimate as compared to natural terrains. A better understanding of the surface-air temperature relationship in urban environments is of significant importance in interpreting urban climatic characteristics and solving related environmental problems via sustainable landscape planning strategies. In this study, we analyse the ground-based in-situ measurements as well as remotely sensed thermal dataset in Phoenix, AZ. Prominent hysteresis effect manifests in correlating diurnal cycles of surface and near-surface air temperatures. In particular, a peculiar pattern of “8-shaped” surface-air temperature hysteresis is observed over concrete pavement especially in winters. Pearson's r values, measuring the strength of surface-air temperature coupling, show strong correlation with incoming solar radiation and wind speed, but are relatively insensitive to humidity. The hysteresis effect diminishes at climatic scale, such that the remotely sensed surface temperature can be approximated as linearly correlated to the near-surface air temperature.

AB - Urban areas, with massive built-up landscapes and manmade structures, have different patterns of local microclimate as compared to natural terrains. A better understanding of the surface-air temperature relationship in urban environments is of significant importance in interpreting urban climatic characteristics and solving related environmental problems via sustainable landscape planning strategies. In this study, we analyse the ground-based in-situ measurements as well as remotely sensed thermal dataset in Phoenix, AZ. Prominent hysteresis effect manifests in correlating diurnal cycles of surface and near-surface air temperatures. In particular, a peculiar pattern of “8-shaped” surface-air temperature hysteresis is observed over concrete pavement especially in winters. Pearson's r values, measuring the strength of surface-air temperature coupling, show strong correlation with incoming solar radiation and wind speed, but are relatively insensitive to humidity. The hysteresis effect diminishes at climatic scale, such that the remotely sensed surface temperature can be approximated as linearly correlated to the near-surface air temperature.

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KW - Sensor network

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