The Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project: Inferring the environmental context of human evolution from eastern African rift lake deposits

A. Cohen, Christopher Campisano, Ramon Arrowsmith, A. Asrat, A. K. Behrensmeyer, A. Deino, C. Feibel, A. Hill, R. Johnson, J. Kingston, H. Lamb, T. Lowenstein, A. Noren, D. Olago, R. B. Owen, R. Potts, Kaye Reed, R. Renaut, F. Schäbitz, J. J. TiercelinM. H. Trauth, J. Wynn, S. Ivory, K. Brady, R. O'Grady, J. Rodysill, J. Githiri, J. Russell, V. Foerster, R. Dommain, S. Rucina, D. Deocampo, J. Russell, A. Billingsley, C. Beck, G. Dorenbeck, L. Dullo, D. Feary, D. Garello, R. Gromig, T. Johnson, A. Junginger, M. Karanja, E. Kimburi, A. Mbuthia, T. McCartney, E. McNulty, V. Muiruri, E. Nambiro, E. W. Negash, D. Njagi, J. N. Wilson, N. Rabideaux, T. Raub, M. J. Sier, P. Smith, J. Urban, M. Warren, M. Yadeta, C. Yost, B. Zinaye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

The role that climate and environmental history may have played in influencing human evolution has been the focus of considerable interest and controversy among paleoanthropologists for decades. Prior attempts to understand the environmental history side of this equation have centered around the study of outcrop sediments and fossils adjacent to where fossil hominins (ancestors or close relatives of modern humans) are found, or from the study of deep sea drill cores. However, outcrop sediments are often highly weathered and thus are unsuitable for some types of paleoclimatic records, and deep sea core records come from long distances away from the actual fossil and stone tool remains. The Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) was developed to address these issues. The project has focused its efforts on the eastern African Rift Valley, where much of the evidence for early hominins has been recovered.We have collected about 2 km of sediment drill core from six basins in Kenya and Ethiopia, in lake deposits immediately adjacent to important fossil hominin and archaeological sites. Collectively these cores cover in time many of the key transitions and critical intervals in human evolutionary history over the last 4 Ma, such as the earliest stone tools, the origin of our own genus Homo, and the earliest anatomically modern Homo sapiens. Here we document the initial field, physical property, and core description results of the 2012-2014 HSPDP coring campaign.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalScientific Drilling
Volume21
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 19 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Mechanical Engineering

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project: Inferring the environmental context of human evolution from eastern African rift lake deposits'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Cohen, A., Campisano, C., Arrowsmith, R., Asrat, A., Behrensmeyer, A. K., Deino, A., Feibel, C., Hill, A., Johnson, R., Kingston, J., Lamb, H., Lowenstein, T., Noren, A., Olago, D., Owen, R. B., Potts, R., Reed, K., Renaut, R., Schäbitz, F., ... Zinaye, B. (2016). The Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project: Inferring the environmental context of human evolution from eastern African rift lake deposits. Scientific Drilling, 21, 1-16. https://doi.org/10.5194/sd-21-1-2016