The Home Environments of Adolescents Whose Parents Legally Immigrated to the United States

Findings from the New Immigrant Survey

Robert Bradley, Amy L. Pennar, Jennifer Glick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Adolescent well-being depends on the quality of their experiences at home. Data from the New Immigrant Survey were used to describe the home environments of 982 children ages 10–17 whose parents legally immigrated to the United States. Thirty-four indicators of home conditions were clustered into 5 domains: (1) discipline and socio-emotional support, (2) learning materials, (3) enriching experiences, (4) family activities, and (5) expectations. Results revealed variation in how frequently adolescents experienced each home environmental condition. As expected, there were differences in the likelihood an adolescent would have most—but not all—experiences connected with home life based on parents’ level of education. The home experiences documented for children of recent legal immigrants were similar to those documented for children of native-born families in other studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 22 2016

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parents
Parents
immigrant
adolescent
experience
Child Welfare
Population Groups
level of education
environmental factors
well-being
Learning
Education
learning
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Discipline
  • Family activities
  • Home environment indicators
  • Immigration
  • Learning materials
  • Parental expectations
  • Parenting
  • Socio-emotional support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

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