The health belief model and adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

G. G. Bond, L. S. Aiken, S. C. Somerville

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

103 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We tested the predictive utility of the health belief model (HBM) for adherence with a complex, ongoing medical regimen in the context of a chronically ill youthful population (56 adolescent outpatients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus; mean age = 14 years). A three-construct model of health beliefs was tested: Threat (perceived susceptibility combined with severity), Benefits-Costs, and Cues to seek treatment. Multiple indicators of compliance were used, and metabolic control was measured by glycosylated hemoglobin. The Benefits-Costs and Cues constructs were related to compliance in the theoretically expected positive direction. Threat interacted with Benefits-Costs in the prediction of compliance and with Cues in the prediction of metabolic control. The greatest compliance was achieved with low perceived Threat and high perceived Benefits-Costs. Poor metabolic control was associated with high Threat and Cues. As age increased, adherence to the exercise, injection, and frequency components of the regimen decreased.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)190-198
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cues
Compliance
Health
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Chronic Disease
Outpatients
Exercise
Injections
Population
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

The health belief model and adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. / Bond, G. G.; Aiken, L. S.; Somerville, S. C.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 11, No. 3, 1992, p. 190-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bond, G. G. ; Aiken, L. S. ; Somerville, S. C. / The health belief model and adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In: Health Psychology. 1992 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 190-198.
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