The framing of atrocities: Documenting and exploring wide variation in aversion to Germans and German-related activities among holocaust survivors

Lina Cherfas, Paul Rozin, Adam B. Cohen, Amelie Davidson, Clark McCauley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Interviews with 29 Holocaust survivors indicate wide variation in degree of aversion to Germans and activities associated with Germany. For some survivors, aversion is limited to those closest to the Nazi perpetrators, for others aversion includes anyone with German ancestry and any situation or product linked to contemporary Germany. This wide range of aversion following horrific experiences is not easily explained by known psychological mechanisms,and has important implications for understanding and ameliorating ethnopolitical conflict. Possible sources of variation in aversion are explored with measures of personality differences and differences in Holocaust experience. Result indicate that degree of trauma during the Holocaust is not significantly related to adversion, and that strong predictors of aversion are degree of blame of Germans not directly involved in the Holocaust, religiosity, and German origin. Aversion to German is strongly related to adversion to contemporary Arabs and Muslims.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-80
Number of pages16
JournalPeace and Conflict
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 20 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Political Science and International Relations

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