The fallout from French nuclear testing in the South Pacific: A longitudinal study of consumer boycotts

Richard Ettenson, Jill Gabrielle Klein

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    154 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose - The frequency and sophistication of consumer boycotts continue to increase from already high levels. Surprisingly, only limited research in marketing has investigated this topic. The purpose of this paper is to provide a strategic analysis of an actual consumer protest with implications for better managerial decisions. Design/methodology/approach - The animosity model of consumer purchase behavior was employed in two longitudinal studies to investigate an ongoing marketplace protest - Australian consumers' boycott of French products. Study 1 was carried out while France was engaged in nuclear testing in the South Pacific. Study 2 was carried out 1 year after the resolution of the conflict. Findings - Results from Study 1 show that Australian consumers' animosity toward France was negatively related to their willingness to purchase French products. Consistent with a key prediction from the animosity model, this effect was independent of evaluations of French product quality. The findings from Study 2 show that, a year after the cessation of nuclear testing, Australian consumers continue to have strong negative affect toward France, which in turn, had negative marketplace consequences for French products. Originality/value - While the results from Study 1 show that consumer anger over nuclear testing did not necessarily lead to the denigration of the quality of French goods, the second study indicates that, beyond the duration of the official protest, there may be repercussions for products associated with the offending party. Accordingly, managers should consider implementing communications programs which, over time, effectively reinforce the quality of their products in the minds of protesting consumers.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)199-224
    Number of pages26
    JournalInternational Marketing Review
    Volume22
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2005

    Fingerprint

    Boycott
    Longitudinal study
    South Pacific
    Testing
    Protest
    France
    Animosity
    Communication
    Purchase
    Anger
    Willingness
    Managers
    Design methodology
    Purchase behavior
    Marketing
    Negative affect
    Evaluation
    Strategic analysis
    Consumer animosity
    Managerial decisions

    Keywords

    • Brands
    • Consumer behaviour
    • International business

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Business and International Management
    • Marketing
    • Economics and Econometrics

    Cite this

    The fallout from French nuclear testing in the South Pacific : A longitudinal study of consumer boycotts. / Ettenson, Richard; Klein, Jill Gabrielle.

    In: International Marketing Review, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2005, p. 199-224.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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