The expression and regulation of negative emotions: Risk factors for young children's peer victimization

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114 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using a short-term longitudinal design, internalizing and externalizing emotions were examined as risk factors for being victimized by peers in early childhood. Regulation, aggression, and withdrawal were also tested as mediators. We found that anger, mediated by aggression and regulation, positively predicted being victimized, although the way in which anger related to victimization risk varied for boys and girls and across time. These findings were robust, particularly for girls, attesting to the importance of externalizing variables as risk factors for young children's victimization. Support for internalizing variables as risk factors for being victimized was weak. The implications of the findings for developmental models connecting symptomatology and victimization are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-353
Number of pages19
JournalDevelopment and psychopathology
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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