The experiences of Western expatriate nursing educators teaching in Eastern Asia

Carolyn S. Melby, Joan E. Dodgson, Marie Tarrant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To describe the lived experience of English-speaking Western nurse educators teaching in East Asian countries. Design: The study design was an application of existential phenomenological approach to qualitative data collection and analysis. Eight expatriate nurse educators who had taught more than 2 years in an East Asian country were interviewed about their experiences between January 2004 and November 2005. Methods: Narrative data were analyzed using a phenomenological approach aimed at distilling the experience of the educators. Each member of the research team analyzed the data, then through group discussions a consensus was reached, paying close attention to developing clear understandings of language nuances and maintaining the participants' voices. Findings: Four themes emerged from the data: (a) differing expectations, (b) the cost of the expatriate experience, (c) bridging pedagogies, and (d) adapting and finding purpose. The tacit meanings of cultural differences affecting participants' experiences are presented. Conclusions: The ways that a collectivist-oriented culture may affect nurse educators coming from a Western individualist worldview needs to continue to be researched to develop better mutual understandings that will lead to culturally collaborative models of nursing practice, education and research. Clinical Relevance: Nurses providing direct care and nurse educators who work with people from cultures other than their own will find the discussion of cross-cultural misunderstandings useful.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-183
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nursing Scholarship
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Far East
Teaching
Nursing
Nurses
Nursing Education Research
Consensus
Language
Costs and Cost Analysis
Research

Keywords

  • Cross-cultural
  • Education
  • International
  • Phenomenology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

The experiences of Western expatriate nursing educators teaching in Eastern Asia. / Melby, Carolyn S.; Dodgson, Joan E.; Tarrant, Marie.

In: Journal of Nursing Scholarship, Vol. 40, No. 2, 06.2008, p. 176-183.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Melby, Carolyn S. ; Dodgson, Joan E. ; Tarrant, Marie. / The experiences of Western expatriate nursing educators teaching in Eastern Asia. In: Journal of Nursing Scholarship. 2008 ; Vol. 40, No. 2. pp. 176-183.
@article{cc889763c93b455a84d049ec7224fa6e,
title = "The experiences of Western expatriate nursing educators teaching in Eastern Asia",
abstract = "Purpose: To describe the lived experience of English-speaking Western nurse educators teaching in East Asian countries. Design: The study design was an application of existential phenomenological approach to qualitative data collection and analysis. Eight expatriate nurse educators who had taught more than 2 years in an East Asian country were interviewed about their experiences between January 2004 and November 2005. Methods: Narrative data were analyzed using a phenomenological approach aimed at distilling the experience of the educators. Each member of the research team analyzed the data, then through group discussions a consensus was reached, paying close attention to developing clear understandings of language nuances and maintaining the participants' voices. Findings: Four themes emerged from the data: (a) differing expectations, (b) the cost of the expatriate experience, (c) bridging pedagogies, and (d) adapting and finding purpose. The tacit meanings of cultural differences affecting participants' experiences are presented. Conclusions: The ways that a collectivist-oriented culture may affect nurse educators coming from a Western individualist worldview needs to continue to be researched to develop better mutual understandings that will lead to culturally collaborative models of nursing practice, education and research. Clinical Relevance: Nurses providing direct care and nurse educators who work with people from cultures other than their own will find the discussion of cross-cultural misunderstandings useful.",
keywords = "Cross-cultural, Education, International, Phenomenology",
author = "Melby, {Carolyn S.} and Dodgson, {Joan E.} and Marie Tarrant",
year = "2008",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1111/j.1547-5069.2008.00223.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "176--183",
journal = "Journal of Nursing Scholarship",
issn = "1527-6546",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The experiences of Western expatriate nursing educators teaching in Eastern Asia

AU - Melby, Carolyn S.

AU - Dodgson, Joan E.

AU - Tarrant, Marie

PY - 2008/6

Y1 - 2008/6

N2 - Purpose: To describe the lived experience of English-speaking Western nurse educators teaching in East Asian countries. Design: The study design was an application of existential phenomenological approach to qualitative data collection and analysis. Eight expatriate nurse educators who had taught more than 2 years in an East Asian country were interviewed about their experiences between January 2004 and November 2005. Methods: Narrative data were analyzed using a phenomenological approach aimed at distilling the experience of the educators. Each member of the research team analyzed the data, then through group discussions a consensus was reached, paying close attention to developing clear understandings of language nuances and maintaining the participants' voices. Findings: Four themes emerged from the data: (a) differing expectations, (b) the cost of the expatriate experience, (c) bridging pedagogies, and (d) adapting and finding purpose. The tacit meanings of cultural differences affecting participants' experiences are presented. Conclusions: The ways that a collectivist-oriented culture may affect nurse educators coming from a Western individualist worldview needs to continue to be researched to develop better mutual understandings that will lead to culturally collaborative models of nursing practice, education and research. Clinical Relevance: Nurses providing direct care and nurse educators who work with people from cultures other than their own will find the discussion of cross-cultural misunderstandings useful.

AB - Purpose: To describe the lived experience of English-speaking Western nurse educators teaching in East Asian countries. Design: The study design was an application of existential phenomenological approach to qualitative data collection and analysis. Eight expatriate nurse educators who had taught more than 2 years in an East Asian country were interviewed about their experiences between January 2004 and November 2005. Methods: Narrative data were analyzed using a phenomenological approach aimed at distilling the experience of the educators. Each member of the research team analyzed the data, then through group discussions a consensus was reached, paying close attention to developing clear understandings of language nuances and maintaining the participants' voices. Findings: Four themes emerged from the data: (a) differing expectations, (b) the cost of the expatriate experience, (c) bridging pedagogies, and (d) adapting and finding purpose. The tacit meanings of cultural differences affecting participants' experiences are presented. Conclusions: The ways that a collectivist-oriented culture may affect nurse educators coming from a Western individualist worldview needs to continue to be researched to develop better mutual understandings that will lead to culturally collaborative models of nursing practice, education and research. Clinical Relevance: Nurses providing direct care and nurse educators who work with people from cultures other than their own will find the discussion of cross-cultural misunderstandings useful.

KW - Cross-cultural

KW - Education

KW - International

KW - Phenomenology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=44349184311&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=44349184311&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1547-5069.2008.00223.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1547-5069.2008.00223.x

M3 - Article

VL - 40

SP - 176

EP - 183

JO - Journal of Nursing Scholarship

JF - Journal of Nursing Scholarship

SN - 1527-6546

IS - 2

ER -