The Enhanced Self-Reported Health Outcome Observed in Hispanics/Latinos Who are Socially-Assigned as White is Dependent on Nativity

Edward Vargas, Gabriel R. Sanchez, Ballington L. Kinlock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A growing body of research seeks to conceptualize race as a multi-dimensional construct, attempting to move beyond a dummy variable approach to study social disparities. This research uses ‘socially-assigned race’, ‘ascribed race’, or ‘what race others think you are’ as opposed to self-identified race to assess self-rated health status among a representative study of the Latino population (n = 1,200). Our analysis shows how important the lived experience of Latinos and Hispanics (as measured by ascribed race and a host of control variables, including nativity and national origin) is on self-reported health. Using a series of logistic regressions, we find support for the ‘white advantage’ in Latino health status that is suggested in the literature, but this finding is sensitive to nativity, citizenship, and national origin. This research informs the study of racial and ethnic disparities, providing a detailed explanation for the ‘white health advantage’ finding within the socially-assigned race and health disparities literature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1803-1810
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 20 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Hispanic Americans
Health
Health Status
Research
Logistic Models
Population

Keywords

  • Ascribed race
  • Citizenship
  • Health disparities
  • Nativity
  • Socially assigned race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The Enhanced Self-Reported Health Outcome Observed in Hispanics/Latinos Who are Socially-Assigned as White is Dependent on Nativity. / Vargas, Edward; Sanchez, Gabriel R.; Kinlock, Ballington L.

In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, Vol. 17, No. 6, 20.11.2014, p. 1803-1810.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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