The energy expenditure of using a "walk-and-work" desk for office workers with obesity

James A. Levine, Jennifer M. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

137 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: For many people, most of the working day is spent sitting in front of a computer screen. Approaches for obesity treatment and prevention are being sought to increase workplace physical activity because low levels of physical activity are associated with obesity. Our hypothesis was that a vertical workstation that allows an obese individual to work while walking would be associated with significant and substantial increases in energy expenditure over seated work. Methods: The vertical workstation is a workstation that allows an office worker to use a standard personal computer while walking on a treadmill at a self-selected velocity. 15 sedentary individuals with obesity (14 women, one man; 43 (7.5) years, 86 (9.6) kg; body mass index 32 (2.6) kg/m 2) underwent measurements of energy expenditure at rest, seated working in an office chair, standing and while walking at a self-selected speed using the vertical workstation. Body composition was measured using dual x ray absorptiometry. Results: The mean (SD) energy expenditure while seated at work in an office chair was 72 (10) kcal/h, whereas the energy expenditure while walking and working at a self-selected velocity of 1.1 (0.4) mph was 191 (29) kcal/h. The mean (SD) increase in energy expenditure for walking-and-working over sitting was 119 (25) kcal/h. Conclusions: If sitting computer-time were replaced by walking-and-working, energy expenditure could increase by 100 kcal/h. Thus, if obese individuals were to replace time spent sitting at the computer with walking computer time by 2-3 h/day, and if other components of energy balance were constant, a weight loss of 20-30 kg/year could occur.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)558-561
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume41
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Energy Metabolism
Walking
Obesity
Exercise
Microcomputers
Body Composition
Workplace
Weight Loss
Body Mass Index
X-Rays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

The energy expenditure of using a "walk-and-work" desk for office workers with obesity. / Levine, James A.; Miller, Jennifer M.

In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 41, No. 9, 09.2007, p. 558-561.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levine, James A. ; Miller, Jennifer M. / The energy expenditure of using a "walk-and-work" desk for office workers with obesity. In: British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 41, No. 9. pp. 558-561.
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