The End of the Dichotomy: The Effect of Social Proximity to Prototype and Periphery Group Members on Political Attitudes*

James S. Krueger, Francisco I. Pedraza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: We extend prototype theory to explain why nonmembers who are socially connected to group members hold political attitudes that differ from nonmembers lacking that connection. We anticipate that the intensity of nonmember attitudes varies by connection to a prototype or periphery group member. Methods: Using data from the 2006 Cooperative Congressional Election Study (CCES), we model group-salient political attitudes for veterans, union members, and their family members. Results: We find social distance from group members is theoretically linked to within-group variation that distinguishes prototype from periphery group members. Conclusion: Analysis of political attitudes is enhanced beyond the traditional member/nonmember dichotomy by accounting for nonmembers’ social distance from group members.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)762-773
Number of pages12
JournalSocial Science Quarterly
Volume99
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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