The empowerment of service workers: what, why, how, and when.

D. E. Bowen, E. E. Lawler

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    647 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In recent years, businesses have rushed to adopt an empowerment approach to service delivery in which employees face customers "free of rulebooks," encouraged to do whatever is necessary to satisfy them. But that approach may not be right for everyone. Bowen and Lawler look at the benefits and costs of empowering employees, the range of management practices that empower employees to varying degrees, and key business characteristics that affect the choice of approaches. Managers need to make sure that there is a good fit between their organizational needs and their approach to frontline employees.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)31-39
    Number of pages9
    JournalSloan Management Review
    Volume33
    Issue number3
    StatePublished - Mar 1992

    Fingerprint

    Personnel
    Practice Management
    Cost-Benefit Analysis
    Industry
    Managers
    Power (Psychology)
    Service workers
    Empowerment
    Employees
    Costs
    Service delivery
    Frontline employees
    Management practices
    Costs and benefits

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    The empowerment of service workers : what, why, how, and when. / Bowen, D. E.; Lawler, E. E.

    In: Sloan Management Review, Vol. 33, No. 3, 03.1992, p. 31-39.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Bowen, DE & Lawler, EE 1992, 'The empowerment of service workers: what, why, how, and when.', Sloan Management Review, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 31-39.
    Bowen, D. E. ; Lawler, E. E. / The empowerment of service workers : what, why, how, and when. In: Sloan Management Review. 1992 ; Vol. 33, No. 3. pp. 31-39.
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