The Emergence of Model Systems to Investigate the Link Between Traumatic Brain Injury and Alzheimer’s Disease

Gayathri Srinivasan, David A. Brafman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated that individuals who have sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) have an elevated risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease and Alzheimer’s-related dementias (AD/ADRD). Despite these connections, the underlying mechanisms by which TBI induces AD-related pathology, neuronal dysfunction, and cognitive decline have yet to be elucidated. In this review, we will discuss the various in vivo and in vitro models that are being employed to provide more definite mechanistic relationships between TBI-induced mechanical injury and AD-related phenotypes. In particular, we will highlight the strengths and weaknesses of each of these model systems as it relates to advancing the understanding of the mechanisms that lead to TBI-induced AD onset and progression as well as providing platforms to evaluate potential therapies. Finally, we will discuss how emerging methods including the use of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cultures and genome engineering technologies can be employed to generate better models of TBI-induced AD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number813544
JournalFrontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 8 2022

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • genome engineering
  • in vitro models
  • in vivo models
  • pluripotent stem cells
  • traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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