The effects of violence exposure on the development of impulse control and future orientation across adolescence and early adulthood: Time-specific and generalized effects in a sample of juvenile offenders

Kathryn C. Monahan, Kevin M. King, Elizabeth P. Shulman, Elizabeth Cauffman, Laurie Chassin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Impulse control and future orientation increase across adolescence, but little is known about how contextual factors shape the development of these capacities. The present study investigates how stress exposure, operationalized as exposure to violence, alters the developmental pattern of impulse control and future orientation across adolescence and early adulthood. In a sample of 1,354 serious juvenile offenders, higher exposure to violence was associated with lower levels of future orientation at age 15 and suppressed development of future orientation from ages 15 to 25. Increases in witnessing violence or victimization were linked to declines in impulse control 1 year later, but only during adolescence. Thus, beyond previous experiences of exposure to violence, witnessing violence and victimization during adolescence conveys unique risk for suppressed development of self-regulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1267-1283
Number of pages17
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Medicine(all)

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