The effects of stroke disability on spousal caregivers

Lee X. Blonder, Shelby Langer, L. Creed Pettigrew, Thomas F. Garrity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the effects of unilateral stroke patients' neurobehavioral characteristics on spousal psychosocial function. Participants: The sample consisted of twenty unilateral stroke patients and their spousal caregivers. Methods: Patient assessments included mood, affect perception, sensorimotor and cognitive function, marital satisfaction, and activities of daily living. Spousal assessments included mood, marital satisfaction, and perceived stress. Results: To avoid the risk of committing a type I error, the alpha-level of 0.05 was corrected for multiple comparisons involving the three outcome measures, resulting in an adjusted alpha of 0.017 (0.05/3). Using this criterion, the negative correlation between patient depression and spousal marital satisfaction was statistically significant (rs = -0.585, p=0.007). There was also a trend for hemispheric side of stroke to correlate with spousal stress (rs = 0.498, p=0.025), such that strokes in the left hemisphere were associated with greater stress, whereas strokes in the right hemisphere were associated with less stress. Conclusion: These results show that patient depression in particular constitutes a risk factor for marital dissatisfaction in the first few months following stroke. Given that spousal partners provide a large portion of informal support to stroke patients, successful treatment of patient depression may have benefits at the level of the individual, family, and community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-92
Number of pages8
JournalNeuroRehabilitation
Volume22
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Caregivers
Stroke
Depression
Activities of Daily Living
Cognition
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Blonder, L. X., Langer, S., Pettigrew, L. C., & Garrity, T. F. (2007). The effects of stroke disability on spousal caregivers. NeuroRehabilitation, 22(2), 85-92.

The effects of stroke disability on spousal caregivers. / Blonder, Lee X.; Langer, Shelby; Pettigrew, L. Creed; Garrity, Thomas F.

In: NeuroRehabilitation, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2007, p. 85-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blonder, LX, Langer, S, Pettigrew, LC & Garrity, TF 2007, 'The effects of stroke disability on spousal caregivers', NeuroRehabilitation, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 85-92.
Blonder LX, Langer S, Pettigrew LC, Garrity TF. The effects of stroke disability on spousal caregivers. NeuroRehabilitation. 2007;22(2):85-92.
Blonder, Lee X. ; Langer, Shelby ; Pettigrew, L. Creed ; Garrity, Thomas F. / The effects of stroke disability on spousal caregivers. In: NeuroRehabilitation. 2007 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 85-92.
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