The effects of redesigning the IDEATel architecture on glucose uploads

Charlyn A. Hilliman, James J. Cimino, Albert M. Lai, David Kaufman, Justin B. Starren, Steven Shea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this evaluation was to determine the effect of redesigning the Informatics for Diabetes Education and Telemedicine (IDEATel) telemedicine architecture on the average upload delay and on the average number of glucose uploads to a central database. These two measures positively influence our ability to deliver timely and accurate patient care to the study population. The redesign was also undertaken to improve the patients' experience in using the system and thereby increase the frequency and timeliness of their self-monitoring behavior. Using the total number of glucose uploads, we compared the delay in glucose upload times according to the type of home telemedicine unit the study participants used and the region where the participants lived. The participants were Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes living in medically underserved neighborhoods in New York City and rural Upstate New York. The populations in these two regions differed considerably in terms of ethnicity, language spoken (Spanish, English), and education level. Participants who had Generation 2 (Gen 2) (mean = 10.75, SD ± 7.96) home telemedicine units had significantly shorter upload delay times (p < 0.001) as measured in days than those participants with Generation 1 (Gen 1) (mean = 22.44, SD ± 11.18) and those who were upgraded from Gen 1 (mean = 20.67, SD ± 8.85) to Gen 2 (mean = 14.93, SD ± 9.37). Additionally, the delay was significantly shorter for participants living upstate (mean = 24.14 days, SD ± 11.95 days) than downstate (mean = 15.30 days, SD ± 7.87 days), t (975) = 13.98, p < 0.01. The system redesign made a significant impact in reducing glucose upload delays of IDEATel participants. However, upload delays were significantly impacted by the region where the participants resided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-254
Number of pages7
JournalTelemedicine and e-Health
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Informatics
Telemedicine
Education
Glucose
Aptitude
Medicare
Population
Patient Care
Language
Databases

Keywords

  • Diabetes telemedicine
  • Technical architecture
  • Telemedicine evaluation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Hilliman, C. A., Cimino, J. J., Lai, A. M., Kaufman, D., Starren, J. B., & Shea, S. (2009). The effects of redesigning the IDEATel architecture on glucose uploads. Telemedicine and e-Health, 15(3), 248-254. https://doi.org/10.1089/tmj.2008.0101

The effects of redesigning the IDEATel architecture on glucose uploads. / Hilliman, Charlyn A.; Cimino, James J.; Lai, Albert M.; Kaufman, David; Starren, Justin B.; Shea, Steven.

In: Telemedicine and e-Health, Vol. 15, No. 3, 01.04.2009, p. 248-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hilliman, CA, Cimino, JJ, Lai, AM, Kaufman, D, Starren, JB & Shea, S 2009, 'The effects of redesigning the IDEATel architecture on glucose uploads', Telemedicine and e-Health, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 248-254. https://doi.org/10.1089/tmj.2008.0101
Hilliman CA, Cimino JJ, Lai AM, Kaufman D, Starren JB, Shea S. The effects of redesigning the IDEATel architecture on glucose uploads. Telemedicine and e-Health. 2009 Apr 1;15(3):248-254. https://doi.org/10.1089/tmj.2008.0101
Hilliman, Charlyn A. ; Cimino, James J. ; Lai, Albert M. ; Kaufman, David ; Starren, Justin B. ; Shea, Steven. / The effects of redesigning the IDEATel architecture on glucose uploads. In: Telemedicine and e-Health. 2009 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 248-254.
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