The Effects of Positive and Negative Parenting Practices on Adolescent Mental Health Outcomes in a Multicultural Sample of Rural Youth

Paul R. Smokowski, Martica L. Bacallao, Katie Stalker, Caroline B R Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The quality of parent–child relationships has a significant impact on adolescent developmental outcomes, especially mental health. Given the lack of research on rural adolescent mental health in general and rural parent–child relationships in particular, the current longitudinal study explores how rural adolescents’ (N = 2,617) perceptions of parenting practices effect their mental health (i.e., anxiety, depression, aggression, self-esteem, future optimism, and school satisfaction) over a 1 year period. Regression models showed that current parenting practices (i.e., in Year 2) were strongly associated with current adolescent mental health outcomes. Negative current parenting, manifesting in parent–adolescent conflict, was related to higher adolescent anxiety, depression, and aggression and lower self-esteem, and school satisfaction. Past parent–adolescent conflict (i.e., in Year 1) also positively predicted adolescent aggression in the present. Current positive parenting (i.e., parent support, parent–child future orientation, and parent education support) was significantly associated with less depression and higher self-esteem, future optimism, and school satisfaction. Past parent education support was also related to current adolescent future optimism. Implications for practice and limitations were discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-345
Number of pages13
JournalChild Psychiatry and Human Development
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Parenting
Mental Health
Aggression
Self Concept
Depression
Anxiety
Education
Rural Health
Longitudinal Studies
Adolescent Health
Research
Optimism
Conflict (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Mental health
  • Parenting
  • Rural
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

The Effects of Positive and Negative Parenting Practices on Adolescent Mental Health Outcomes in a Multicultural Sample of Rural Youth. / Smokowski, Paul R.; Bacallao, Martica L.; Stalker, Katie; Evans, Caroline B R.

In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, Vol. 46, No. 3, 01.06.2014, p. 333-345.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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