The effects of different recruitment and incentive strategies for body acceptance programs on college women

Marisol Perez La Mar, Tara K. Ohrt, Amanda B. Bruening

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study—getting individuals to participate in eating disorder prevention programs—is difficult yet crucial for dissemination efforts. Little research has investigated what incentive strategies can be particularly efficacious, and even less is published on their cost-effectiveness. The following study examined two types of email advertisements and six incentive strategies in an empirically supported body acceptance program disseminated at a large university. A total of 5,978 undergraduate women received email advertisements, of which 430 signed up to participate. An additional 588 who did not participate were assessed. Results suggest the most effective incentives were offering gift certificates for free manicure services and free personal fashion style training gift certificates from a student organization. Undergraduate women were least likely to attend due to lack of knowledge about the program, not having a friend to attend with them, or inconvenient times. Implications for future research are explored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalEating Disorders
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 17 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

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