The effects of cognitive-behavior modification on private speech and task performance during problem solving among learning-disabled and normally achieving children

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35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research has supported the hypothesis that poor performance among learning-disabled (LD) children is frequently the result of deficits in self-regulation of strategic behaviors, rather than structural or ability deficits. As a result, cognitive-behavior modification (CBM) techniques that emphasize development of self-regulation through self-verbalizations (private speech) have been strongly recommended. The present study examined the natural occurrence of regulatory private speech among LD and normally achieving children during problem solving, as well as the effects of CBM training on private speech and task performance. Results indicated significant deficiencies in private speech and task performance among LD children; CBM training resulted in significant improvements. These results provide further verification of deficits in self-regulation of cognitive activity among LD children and import implications for intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-76
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1986
Externally publishedYes

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Behavior Therapy
Task Performance and Analysis
Disabled Children
Learning
Aptitude
Research
Self-Control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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