The effect of rain on air-water gas exchange

David T. Ho, Larry F. Bliven, Rik Wanninkhof, Peter Schlosser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship between gas transfer velocity and rain rate was investigated at NASA's Rain-Sea Interaction Facility (RSIF) using several SF6 evasion experiments. During each experiment, a water tank below the rain simulator was supersaturated with SF6, a synthetic gas, and the gas transfer velocities were calculated from the measured decrease in SF6 concentration with time. The results from experiments with 18 different rain rates (7 to 110 mm h-1) and 1 of 2 dropsizes (2.8 or 4.2 mm diameter) confirm a significant and systematic enhancement of air-water gas exchange by rainfall. The gas transfer velocities derived from our experiment were related to the kinetic energy flux calculated from the rain rate and dropsize. The relationship obtained for mono-dropsize rain at the RSIF was extrapolated to natural rain using the kinetic energy flux of natural rain calculated from the Marshall-Palmer raindrop size distribution. Results of laboratory experiments at RSIF were compared to field observations made during a tropical rainstorm in Miami, Florida and show good agreement between laboratory and field data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-158
Number of pages10
JournalTellus, Series B: Chemical and Physical Meteorology
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

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gas exchange
air
water
energy flux
gas
kinetic energy
experiment
rain
effect
raindrop
rainstorm
simulator
rainfall

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

The effect of rain on air-water gas exchange. / Ho, David T.; Bliven, Larry F.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Schlosser, Peter.

In: Tellus, Series B: Chemical and Physical Meteorology, Vol. 49, No. 2, 01.01.1997, p. 149-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ho, David T. ; Bliven, Larry F. ; Wanninkhof, Rik ; Schlosser, Peter. / The effect of rain on air-water gas exchange. In: Tellus, Series B: Chemical and Physical Meteorology. 1997 ; Vol. 49, No. 2. pp. 149-158.
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