The effect of physician characteristics on compliance with adult preventive care guidelines

John W. Ely, Christopher J. Goerdt, George R. Bergus, Colin P. West, Jeffrey D. Dawson, Bradley Doebbeling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objectives: This study identified physician characteristic and attitudes related to self-ported compliance with adult prevention guidelines. Methods: A questionnaire was mailed to family practice and internal medicine residents and faculty at the University of Iowa (n=209). The questionnatre's 78 items fell into seven categories, including physician demographics, history-taking practices, counseling practices, self- perceived effectiveness in changing patient behavior, beliefs about preventive care, knowledge about preventive care, and perceived barriers to the delivery of preventive care. Results: Campliance with history-taking recommendations was Independently associated with high knowledge scores, female physician gender, and high self-perceived effectiveness in changing patient behavior. The only factor that was independently associated with counseling efforts was self-perceived effectiveness in changing patient behavior. Conclusions: Factors that were independently associated with self- reported preventive care efforts include female physician gender, knowledge about preventive care guidelines, and perceived effectiveness in changing patient behavior. After controlling for these factors, other variables such as lack of time, lack of reminder systems, attitudes about preventive care, and amount of formal preventive care education were not related to self- reported compliance with counseling and history-taking recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-39
Number of pages6
JournalFamily Medicine
Volume30
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Preventive Medicine
Guidelines
Physicians
Counseling
History
Reminder Systems
Family Practice
Internal Medicine
Demography
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Ely, J. W., Goerdt, C. J., Bergus, G. R., West, C. P., Dawson, J. D., & Doebbeling, B. (1998). The effect of physician characteristics on compliance with adult preventive care guidelines. Family Medicine, 30(1), 34-39.

The effect of physician characteristics on compliance with adult preventive care guidelines. / Ely, John W.; Goerdt, Christopher J.; Bergus, George R.; West, Colin P.; Dawson, Jeffrey D.; Doebbeling, Bradley.

In: Family Medicine, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.1998, p. 34-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ely, JW, Goerdt, CJ, Bergus, GR, West, CP, Dawson, JD & Doebbeling, B 1998, 'The effect of physician characteristics on compliance with adult preventive care guidelines', Family Medicine, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 34-39.
Ely, John W. ; Goerdt, Christopher J. ; Bergus, George R. ; West, Colin P. ; Dawson, Jeffrey D. ; Doebbeling, Bradley. / The effect of physician characteristics on compliance with adult preventive care guidelines. In: Family Medicine. 1998 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 34-39.
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