The Effect of Methylphenidate on the Microstructure of Schedule-Induced Polydipsia in an animal model of ADHD

Javier Íbias, Carter W. Daniels, Miguel Miguéns, Ricardo Pellón, Federico Sanabria

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP) was established in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY), and Wistar rats, using a multiple fixed-time (FT) schedule of food delivery, with 30- and 90-s components. Thereafter, animals were exposed to methylphenidate (MPH; 2.5 mg/kg/d) for six consecutive SIP sessions. A test to assess possible sensitization effects was also conducted four days after termination of the drug treatment. At baseline, FT 90-s produced longer and more frequent drinking episodes in SHR than in WKY. An analysis of the distribution of inter-lick intervals revealed that drinking was organized in bouts, which were shorter in SHR than in WKY. Across strains and schedules, MPH shifted drinking episodes towards the beginning of inter-food intervals, which may reflect a stimulant effect on SIP. MPH transiently reduced the frequency of drinking episodes in WKY in FT 30-s, and more permanently reduced the frequency of licking bouts in Wistar rats. MPH also increased the length of licking bouts in Wistar rats. Overall, SHR displayed a hyperactive-like pattern of drinking (frequent but short bouts), which 2.5 mg/kg MPH appears to reduce in WKY and Wistar but not in SHR rats. It appears that therapeutic effects of MPH on hyperactive-like SIP require higher doses in SHR relative to control strains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-217
Number of pages7
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume333
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 30 2017

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Polydipsia
Methylphenidate
Inbred SHR Rats
Inbred WKY Rats
Appointments and Schedules
Animal Models
Drinking
Wistar Rats
Food
Therapeutic Uses
5,10-dihydro-5-methylphenazine
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • Bouts
  • Methylphenidate
  • Schedule-induced polydipsia
  • Spontaneously hypertensive rat
  • Wistar Kyoto rats

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

The Effect of Methylphenidate on the Microstructure of Schedule-Induced Polydipsia in an animal model of ADHD. / Íbias, Javier; Daniels, Carter W.; Miguéns, Miguel; Pellón, Ricardo; Sanabria, Federico.

In: Behavioural Brain Research, Vol. 333, 30.08.2017, p. 211-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Íbias, Javier ; Daniels, Carter W. ; Miguéns, Miguel ; Pellón, Ricardo ; Sanabria, Federico. / The Effect of Methylphenidate on the Microstructure of Schedule-Induced Polydipsia in an animal model of ADHD. In: Behavioural Brain Research. 2017 ; Vol. 333. pp. 211-217.
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