The effect of meditation and physical activity on the mental health impact of covid-19-related stress and attention to news among mobile app users in the united states: Cross-sectional survey

Jennifer Green, Jennifer Huberty, Megan Puzia, Chad Stecher

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has been declared an international public health emergency, and it may have long-lasting effects on people's mental health. There is a need to identify effective health behaviors to mitigate the negative mental health impact of COVID-19. Objective: The objectives of this study were to (1) examine the regional differences in mental health and COVID-19-related worry, attention to news, and stress, in light of the state-level prevalence of COVID-19 cases; (2) estimate the associations between mental health and COVID-19-related worry, attention to news, and stress and health behavior engagement (ie, physical activity, mindfulness meditation); and (3) explore the mediating effect of health behavior engagement on the associations between mental health and COVID-19-related worry, attention to news, and stress. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was distributed to a sample of US adult paying subscribers to the Calm app (data were collected from April 22 to June 3, 2020). The survey assessed COVID-19-related worry, attention to news, and stress; health behavior engagement; and mental health (ie, perceived stress, posttraumatic stress disorder, and anxiety and depression). Statistical analyses were performed using R software. Differences in COVID-19-related worry, attention to news, and stress and mental health by location were assessed using t tests and chi-square tests. Logistic and ordinary least squares models were used to regress mental health and health behavior on COVID-19-related worry, attention to news, and stress; moreover, causal mediation analysis was used to estimate the significance of the mediation effects. Results: The median age of the respondents (N=8392) was 47 years (SD 13.8). Participants in the Mid-Atlantic region (New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania) reported higher levels of stress, more severe depression symptoms, greater worry about COVID-19, paying more attention to COVID-19-related news, and more stress related to social distancing recommendations than participants living in other regions. The association between worry about COVID-19 and perceived stress was significantly mediated by changes in physical activity (P<.001), strength of meditation habit (P<.001), and stopping meditation (P=.046). The association between worry about COVID-19 and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms was significantly mediated by changes in physical activity (P<.001) and strength of meditation habit (P<.001). Conclusions: Our findings describe the mental health impact of COVID-19 and outline how continued participation in health behaviors such as physical activity and mindfulness meditation reduce worsening of mental health due to the COVID-19 pandemic. These data have important implications for public health agencies and health organizations to promote the maintenance of health habits to reduce the residual mental health burden of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere28479
JournalJMIR Mental Health
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • Coronavirus
  • Health behavior
  • MHealth
  • Mental health
  • Mindfulness meditation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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