The effect of making a prediction about the outcome of a consumption experience on the enjoyment of that experience

Naomi Mandel, Stephen M. Nowlis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Does predicting the outcome of an uncertain event enhance the enjoyment of observing that event? The current popularity of office pools, spoiler message boards, and online betting Web sites seems to suggest that the act of prediction increases enjoyment. However, in a series of four experiments, we find that consumers who make predictions about uncertain events enjoy observing those events significantly less than those who do not make predictions, despite consumers' expectations to the contrary. We explain our results in terms of anticipated regret. In fact, removing the source of anticipated regret eliminates the negative effect of prediction on enjoyment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-20
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Consumer Research
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008

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event
experience
popularity
Consumption experience
Prediction
Enjoyment
experiment
Consumer expectations
Betting
Web sites
Experiment
Web Sites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Marketing

Cite this

The effect of making a prediction about the outcome of a consumption experience on the enjoyment of that experience. / Mandel, Naomi; Nowlis, Stephen M.

In: Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 35, No. 1, 06.2008, p. 9-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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