The effect of genotype on response thresholds to sucrose and foraging behavior of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.)

Robert Page, J. Erber, M. K. Fondrk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

226 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Honey bee foragers were tested for their proboscis extension response (PER) to water and varying solutions of sucrose. Returning pollen and nectar foragers were collected at the entrance of a colony and were assayed in the laboratory. Pollen foragers had a significantly higher probability of responding to water and to lower concentrations of sucrose. Bees derived from artificially selected high- and low-pollen-hoarding strains were also tested using the proboscis extension assay. Returning foragers were captured and tested for PERs to 30% sucrose. Results demonstrated a genotypic effect on PERs of returning foragers. The PERs of departing high- and low-strain foragers were consistent with those of returning foragers. The PERs were related to nectar and water reward perception of foragers. High strain bees were more likely to return with loads of water and lower concentrations of sucrose than foragers from the low pollen strain. Low-strain bees were more likely to return empty. We identified a previously mapped genomic region that contains a variable quantitative trait locus that appears to influence sucrose response thresholds. These studies demonstrate a gene-brain-behavior pathway that can be altered as a consequence of colony-level selection for quantities of stored food.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)489-500
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Comparative Physiology - A Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
Volume182
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Honey
Bees
honey
foraging behavior
Pollen
sucrose
Apis mellifera
bee
honey bees
Sucrose
genotype
pollen
Genotype
foraging
Plant Nectar
Water
nectar
Apoidea
proboscis
water

Keywords

  • Behavior
  • Foraging
  • Genetics
  • Honey bee
  • Neurobiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

The effect of genotype on response thresholds to sucrose and foraging behavior of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.). / Page, Robert; Erber, J.; Fondrk, M. K.

In: Journal of Comparative Physiology - A Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology, Vol. 182, No. 4, 04.1998, p. 489-500.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{bd597ea2fb104e8b84b11082afb003e0,
title = "The effect of genotype on response thresholds to sucrose and foraging behavior of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.)",
abstract = "Honey bee foragers were tested for their proboscis extension response (PER) to water and varying solutions of sucrose. Returning pollen and nectar foragers were collected at the entrance of a colony and were assayed in the laboratory. Pollen foragers had a significantly higher probability of responding to water and to lower concentrations of sucrose. Bees derived from artificially selected high- and low-pollen-hoarding strains were also tested using the proboscis extension assay. Returning foragers were captured and tested for PERs to 30{\%} sucrose. Results demonstrated a genotypic effect on PERs of returning foragers. The PERs of departing high- and low-strain foragers were consistent with those of returning foragers. The PERs were related to nectar and water reward perception of foragers. High strain bees were more likely to return with loads of water and lower concentrations of sucrose than foragers from the low pollen strain. Low-strain bees were more likely to return empty. We identified a previously mapped genomic region that contains a variable quantitative trait locus that appears to influence sucrose response thresholds. These studies demonstrate a gene-brain-behavior pathway that can be altered as a consequence of colony-level selection for quantities of stored food.",
keywords = "Behavior, Foraging, Genetics, Honey bee, Neurobiology",
author = "Robert Page and J. Erber and Fondrk, {M. K.}",
year = "1998",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1007/s003590050196",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "182",
pages = "489--500",
journal = "Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology",
issn = "0340-7594",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of genotype on response thresholds to sucrose and foraging behavior of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.)

AU - Page, Robert

AU - Erber, J.

AU - Fondrk, M. K.

PY - 1998/4

Y1 - 1998/4

N2 - Honey bee foragers were tested for their proboscis extension response (PER) to water and varying solutions of sucrose. Returning pollen and nectar foragers were collected at the entrance of a colony and were assayed in the laboratory. Pollen foragers had a significantly higher probability of responding to water and to lower concentrations of sucrose. Bees derived from artificially selected high- and low-pollen-hoarding strains were also tested using the proboscis extension assay. Returning foragers were captured and tested for PERs to 30% sucrose. Results demonstrated a genotypic effect on PERs of returning foragers. The PERs of departing high- and low-strain foragers were consistent with those of returning foragers. The PERs were related to nectar and water reward perception of foragers. High strain bees were more likely to return with loads of water and lower concentrations of sucrose than foragers from the low pollen strain. Low-strain bees were more likely to return empty. We identified a previously mapped genomic region that contains a variable quantitative trait locus that appears to influence sucrose response thresholds. These studies demonstrate a gene-brain-behavior pathway that can be altered as a consequence of colony-level selection for quantities of stored food.

AB - Honey bee foragers were tested for their proboscis extension response (PER) to water and varying solutions of sucrose. Returning pollen and nectar foragers were collected at the entrance of a colony and were assayed in the laboratory. Pollen foragers had a significantly higher probability of responding to water and to lower concentrations of sucrose. Bees derived from artificially selected high- and low-pollen-hoarding strains were also tested using the proboscis extension assay. Returning foragers were captured and tested for PERs to 30% sucrose. Results demonstrated a genotypic effect on PERs of returning foragers. The PERs of departing high- and low-strain foragers were consistent with those of returning foragers. The PERs were related to nectar and water reward perception of foragers. High strain bees were more likely to return with loads of water and lower concentrations of sucrose than foragers from the low pollen strain. Low-strain bees were more likely to return empty. We identified a previously mapped genomic region that contains a variable quantitative trait locus that appears to influence sucrose response thresholds. These studies demonstrate a gene-brain-behavior pathway that can be altered as a consequence of colony-level selection for quantities of stored food.

KW - Behavior

KW - Foraging

KW - Genetics

KW - Honey bee

KW - Neurobiology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=2642644572&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=2642644572&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s003590050196

DO - 10.1007/s003590050196

M3 - Article

VL - 182

SP - 489

EP - 500

JO - Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology

JF - Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology

SN - 0340-7594

IS - 4

ER -