The ecology of early childhood risk: A canonical correlation analysis of children's adjustment, family, and community context in a high-risk sample

Corrie L. Vilsaint, Sophie M. Aiyer, Melvin N. Wilson, Daniel S. Shaw, Thomas J. Dishion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ecology of the emergence of psychopathology in early childhood is often approached by the analysis of a limited number of contextual risk factors. In the present study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of ecological risk by conducting a canonical correlation analysis of 13 risk factors at child age 2 and seven narrow-band scales of internalizing and externalizing problem behaviors at child age 4, using a sample of 364 geographically and ethnically diverse, disadvantaged primary caregivers, alternative caregivers, and preschool-age children. Participants were recruited from Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children sites and were screened for family risk. Canonical correlation analysis revealed that (1) a first latent combination of family and individual risks of caregivers predicted combinations of child emotional and behavioral problems, and that (2) a second latent combination of contextual and structural risks predicted child somatic complaints. Specifically, (1) the combination of chaotic home, conflict with child, parental depression, and parenting hassles predicted a co-occurrence of internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and (2) the combination of father absence, perceived discrimination, neighborhood danger, and fewer children living in the home predicted child somatic complaints. The research findings are discussed in terms of the development of psychopathology, as well as the potential prevention needs of families in high-risk contexts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-277
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Primary Prevention
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Social Adjustment
Ecology
Caregivers
Psychopathology
Food Assistance
Parenting
Vulnerable Populations
Preschool Children
Fathers
Depression
Research

Keywords

  • Canonical correlation analysis
  • Externalizing
  • Internalizing
  • Psychopathology
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The ecology of early childhood risk : A canonical correlation analysis of children's adjustment, family, and community context in a high-risk sample. / Vilsaint, Corrie L.; Aiyer, Sophie M.; Wilson, Melvin N.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Dishion, Thomas J.

In: Journal of Primary Prevention, Vol. 34, No. 4, 08.2013, p. 261-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vilsaint, Corrie L. ; Aiyer, Sophie M. ; Wilson, Melvin N. ; Shaw, Daniel S. ; Dishion, Thomas J. / The ecology of early childhood risk : A canonical correlation analysis of children's adjustment, family, and community context in a high-risk sample. In: Journal of Primary Prevention. 2013 ; Vol. 34, No. 4. pp. 261-277.
@article{2671dddc9b3043a9a1f7cfc64c83747f,
title = "The ecology of early childhood risk: A canonical correlation analysis of children's adjustment, family, and community context in a high-risk sample",
abstract = "The ecology of the emergence of psychopathology in early childhood is often approached by the analysis of a limited number of contextual risk factors. In the present study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of ecological risk by conducting a canonical correlation analysis of 13 risk factors at child age 2 and seven narrow-band scales of internalizing and externalizing problem behaviors at child age 4, using a sample of 364 geographically and ethnically diverse, disadvantaged primary caregivers, alternative caregivers, and preschool-age children. Participants were recruited from Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children sites and were screened for family risk. Canonical correlation analysis revealed that (1) a first latent combination of family and individual risks of caregivers predicted combinations of child emotional and behavioral problems, and that (2) a second latent combination of contextual and structural risks predicted child somatic complaints. Specifically, (1) the combination of chaotic home, conflict with child, parental depression, and parenting hassles predicted a co-occurrence of internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and (2) the combination of father absence, perceived discrimination, neighborhood danger, and fewer children living in the home predicted child somatic complaints. The research findings are discussed in terms of the development of psychopathology, as well as the potential prevention needs of families in high-risk contexts.",
keywords = "Canonical correlation analysis, Externalizing, Internalizing, Psychopathology, Risk factors",
author = "Vilsaint, {Corrie L.} and Aiyer, {Sophie M.} and Wilson, {Melvin N.} and Shaw, {Daniel S.} and Dishion, {Thomas J.}",
year = "2013",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1007/s10935-013-0305-4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "261--277",
journal = "Journal of Primary Prevention",
issn = "0278-095X",
publisher = "Kluwer Academic/Human Sciences Press Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The ecology of early childhood risk

T2 - A canonical correlation analysis of children's adjustment, family, and community context in a high-risk sample

AU - Vilsaint, Corrie L.

AU - Aiyer, Sophie M.

AU - Wilson, Melvin N.

AU - Shaw, Daniel S.

AU - Dishion, Thomas J.

PY - 2013/8

Y1 - 2013/8

N2 - The ecology of the emergence of psychopathology in early childhood is often approached by the analysis of a limited number of contextual risk factors. In the present study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of ecological risk by conducting a canonical correlation analysis of 13 risk factors at child age 2 and seven narrow-band scales of internalizing and externalizing problem behaviors at child age 4, using a sample of 364 geographically and ethnically diverse, disadvantaged primary caregivers, alternative caregivers, and preschool-age children. Participants were recruited from Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children sites and were screened for family risk. Canonical correlation analysis revealed that (1) a first latent combination of family and individual risks of caregivers predicted combinations of child emotional and behavioral problems, and that (2) a second latent combination of contextual and structural risks predicted child somatic complaints. Specifically, (1) the combination of chaotic home, conflict with child, parental depression, and parenting hassles predicted a co-occurrence of internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and (2) the combination of father absence, perceived discrimination, neighborhood danger, and fewer children living in the home predicted child somatic complaints. The research findings are discussed in terms of the development of psychopathology, as well as the potential prevention needs of families in high-risk contexts.

AB - The ecology of the emergence of psychopathology in early childhood is often approached by the analysis of a limited number of contextual risk factors. In the present study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of ecological risk by conducting a canonical correlation analysis of 13 risk factors at child age 2 and seven narrow-band scales of internalizing and externalizing problem behaviors at child age 4, using a sample of 364 geographically and ethnically diverse, disadvantaged primary caregivers, alternative caregivers, and preschool-age children. Participants were recruited from Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children sites and were screened for family risk. Canonical correlation analysis revealed that (1) a first latent combination of family and individual risks of caregivers predicted combinations of child emotional and behavioral problems, and that (2) a second latent combination of contextual and structural risks predicted child somatic complaints. Specifically, (1) the combination of chaotic home, conflict with child, parental depression, and parenting hassles predicted a co-occurrence of internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and (2) the combination of father absence, perceived discrimination, neighborhood danger, and fewer children living in the home predicted child somatic complaints. The research findings are discussed in terms of the development of psychopathology, as well as the potential prevention needs of families in high-risk contexts.

KW - Canonical correlation analysis

KW - Externalizing

KW - Internalizing

KW - Psychopathology

KW - Risk factors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84885170838&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84885170838&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10935-013-0305-4

DO - 10.1007/s10935-013-0305-4

M3 - Article

C2 - 23700232

AN - SCOPUS:84885170838

VL - 34

SP - 261

EP - 277

JO - Journal of Primary Prevention

JF - Journal of Primary Prevention

SN - 0278-095X

IS - 4

ER -