The “digital revolution” reconsidered – NPS Christian bay best paper award APSA 2015, San Francisco, CA

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This article responds to the 2014 American Political Science Association Annual Conference’s theme of “Politics After the Digital Revolution.” It first gives a brief assessment of how the discipline of political science has reacted to the digital revolution. It then seeks to couch the putative revolution in Thorstein Veblen’s theory of a “machine process” in order to recast it less as a discrete phenomenon to be dealt with by the discipline, but instead as part of an evolutionary process of social change that instils habits of mind of those who are subject to it, and who in turn, influence the machine process itself in a co-determinant manner. This article offers the synthesis of Veblen and the Frankfurt School to theorize how the digital revolution might be critically assessed in its evolutionary framework, and speaks towards an evolutionary critical theory for analysing political society beyond discrete events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-115
Number of pages16
JournalNew Political Science
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2016

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political science
Frankfurt School
evolutionary theory
critical theory
habits
social change
determinants
politics
event
Society

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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The “digital revolution” reconsidered – NPS Christian bay best paper award APSA 2015, San Francisco, CA. / Kirsch, Robert.

In: New Political Science, Vol. 38, No. 1, 02.01.2016, p. 100-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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