The digital reality

E-government and access to technology and internet for American indian and Alaska native populations

Nicholet Deschine Parkhurst, Emery Tahy, Traci Morris, Karen Mossberger

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Information and communications technologies are powerful resources and tools for tribal governments to engage with their constituents, deliver services, conduct efficient and transparent administration, interact with other governments, and carry out policies. Digital government may in many ways be even more critical for tribes than for many other governments. As sovereign nations, tribal governments are engaged in complex relationships with other governments: local, state and federal governments. They are frequently in geographically isolated locations, with often-dispersed populations. The capacity to bridge distance can convey benefits for service delivery and civic engagement, and can connect communities with resources for health, economic development, and education. In this paper, we review research on Native American technology use and the limitations of available data. Because of the contrast between residents of urban areas and tribal lands, we examine differences in cell phone, computer and Internet use for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan Native populations, by education and income. We propose a research agenda utilizing this data, to support action to remedy disparities and to harness the potential of technology for tribal governments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationACM International Conference Proceeding Series
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages217-219
Number of pages3
Volume27-30-May-2015
ISBN (Print)9781450336000
DOIs
StatePublished - May 27 2015
Event16th Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research, dg.o 2015 - Phoenix, United States
Duration: May 27 2015May 30 2015

Other

Other16th Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research, dg.o 2015
CountryUnited States
CityPhoenix
Period5/27/155/30/15

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Education
Health
Economics
Communication

Keywords

  • (In)Equality
  • American Indian
  • Digital divide
  • Digital government
  • Tribal government

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Software

Cite this

Parkhurst, N. D., Tahy, E., Morris, T., & Mossberger, K. (2015). The digital reality: E-government and access to technology and internet for American indian and Alaska native populations. In ACM International Conference Proceeding Series (Vol. 27-30-May-2015, pp. 217-219). Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/2757401.2757424

The digital reality : E-government and access to technology and internet for American indian and Alaska native populations. / Parkhurst, Nicholet Deschine; Tahy, Emery; Morris, Traci; Mossberger, Karen.

ACM International Conference Proceeding Series. Vol. 27-30-May-2015 Association for Computing Machinery, 2015. p. 217-219.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Parkhurst, ND, Tahy, E, Morris, T & Mossberger, K 2015, The digital reality: E-government and access to technology and internet for American indian and Alaska native populations. in ACM International Conference Proceeding Series. vol. 27-30-May-2015, Association for Computing Machinery, pp. 217-219, 16th Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research, dg.o 2015, Phoenix, United States, 5/27/15. https://doi.org/10.1145/2757401.2757424
Parkhurst ND, Tahy E, Morris T, Mossberger K. The digital reality: E-government and access to technology and internet for American indian and Alaska native populations. In ACM International Conference Proceeding Series. Vol. 27-30-May-2015. Association for Computing Machinery. 2015. p. 217-219 https://doi.org/10.1145/2757401.2757424
Parkhurst, Nicholet Deschine ; Tahy, Emery ; Morris, Traci ; Mossberger, Karen. / The digital reality : E-government and access to technology and internet for American indian and Alaska native populations. ACM International Conference Proceeding Series. Vol. 27-30-May-2015 Association for Computing Machinery, 2015. pp. 217-219
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