The development of callous-unemotional traits and antisocial behavior in children

Are there shared and/or unique predictors?

Dustin Pardini, John E. Lochman, Nicole Powell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

160 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Callous and unemotional (CU) traits have been linked to severe antisocial behavior in youth, but studies examining the etiology of CU traits are lacking. Based on prior research, it was hypothesized that childhood anxiety and parenting practices would interact to predict changes in CU traits over time. Hypotheses were tested using a sample of 120 moderate to highly aggressive fifth graders followed over a 1-year period. Although CU traits displayed moderate temporal stability and predicted increases in antisocial behavior, evidence suggested that these features were not immutable. Children exposed to lower levels of physical punishment showed decreases in CU traits over time, whereas higher levels of child-reported parental warmth and involvement predicted decreases in both CU traits and antisocial behavior over time. Lower levels of anxiety were uniquely related to increased CU traits for children who described their primary caregiver as exhibiting low warmth and involvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-333
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume36
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Child Behavior
Anxiety
Punishment
Parenting
Caregivers
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

The development of callous-unemotional traits and antisocial behavior in children : Are there shared and/or unique predictors? / Pardini, Dustin; Lochman, John E.; Powell, Nicole.

In: Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Vol. 36, No. 3, 2007, p. 319-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{be13d77a65c54925b7b4660446cdcbd8,
title = "The development of callous-unemotional traits and antisocial behavior in children: Are there shared and/or unique predictors?",
abstract = "Callous and unemotional (CU) traits have been linked to severe antisocial behavior in youth, but studies examining the etiology of CU traits are lacking. Based on prior research, it was hypothesized that childhood anxiety and parenting practices would interact to predict changes in CU traits over time. Hypotheses were tested using a sample of 120 moderate to highly aggressive fifth graders followed over a 1-year period. Although CU traits displayed moderate temporal stability and predicted increases in antisocial behavior, evidence suggested that these features were not immutable. Children exposed to lower levels of physical punishment showed decreases in CU traits over time, whereas higher levels of child-reported parental warmth and involvement predicted decreases in both CU traits and antisocial behavior over time. Lower levels of anxiety were uniquely related to increased CU traits for children who described their primary caregiver as exhibiting low warmth and involvement.",
author = "Dustin Pardini and Lochman, {John E.} and Nicole Powell",
year = "2007",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "36",
pages = "319--333",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology",
issn = "1537-4416",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The development of callous-unemotional traits and antisocial behavior in children

T2 - Are there shared and/or unique predictors?

AU - Pardini, Dustin

AU - Lochman, John E.

AU - Powell, Nicole

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Callous and unemotional (CU) traits have been linked to severe antisocial behavior in youth, but studies examining the etiology of CU traits are lacking. Based on prior research, it was hypothesized that childhood anxiety and parenting practices would interact to predict changes in CU traits over time. Hypotheses were tested using a sample of 120 moderate to highly aggressive fifth graders followed over a 1-year period. Although CU traits displayed moderate temporal stability and predicted increases in antisocial behavior, evidence suggested that these features were not immutable. Children exposed to lower levels of physical punishment showed decreases in CU traits over time, whereas higher levels of child-reported parental warmth and involvement predicted decreases in both CU traits and antisocial behavior over time. Lower levels of anxiety were uniquely related to increased CU traits for children who described their primary caregiver as exhibiting low warmth and involvement.

AB - Callous and unemotional (CU) traits have been linked to severe antisocial behavior in youth, but studies examining the etiology of CU traits are lacking. Based on prior research, it was hypothesized that childhood anxiety and parenting practices would interact to predict changes in CU traits over time. Hypotheses were tested using a sample of 120 moderate to highly aggressive fifth graders followed over a 1-year period. Although CU traits displayed moderate temporal stability and predicted increases in antisocial behavior, evidence suggested that these features were not immutable. Children exposed to lower levels of physical punishment showed decreases in CU traits over time, whereas higher levels of child-reported parental warmth and involvement predicted decreases in both CU traits and antisocial behavior over time. Lower levels of anxiety were uniquely related to increased CU traits for children who described their primary caregiver as exhibiting low warmth and involvement.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34548581965&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34548581965&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 36

SP - 319

EP - 333

JO - Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

JF - Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

SN - 1537-4416

IS - 3

ER -