The deep propagating gravity wave experiment (deepwave): An airborne and ground-based exploration of gravity wave propagation and effects from their sources throughout the lower and middle atmosphere

David C. Fritts, Ronald B. Smith, Michael J. Taylor, James D. Doyle, Stephen D. Eckermann, Andreas Dörnbrack, Markus Rapp, Bifford P. Williams, P. Dominique Pautet, Katrina Bossert, Neal R. Criddle, Carolyn A. Reynolds, P. Alex Reinecke, Michael Uddstrom, Michael J. Revell, Richard Turner, Bernd Kaifler, Johannes S. Wagner, Tyler Mixa, Christopher G. KruseAlison D. Nugent, Campbell D. Watson, Sonja Gisinger, Steven M. Smith, Ruth S. Lieberman, Brian Laughman, James J. Moore, William O. Brown, Julie A. Haggerty, Alison Rockwell, Gregory J. Stossmeister, Steven F. Williams, Gonzalo Hernandez, Damian J. Murphy, Andrew R. Klekociuk, Iain M. Reid, Jun Ma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

121 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Deep Propagating Gravity Wave Experiment (DEEPWAVE) was the first comprehensive measurement program devoted to quantifying the evolution of gravity waves (GWs) arising from sources at lower altitudes as they propagate, interact with mean and other wave motions, and ultimately dissipate from Earth's surface into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). DEEPWAVE airborne measurements employed two research aircraft during a core 6-week airborne field program based at Christchurch, New Zealand, from 6 June to 21 July 2014. The data were relayed via satellite to the ground for quality control and processing by EOL-trained student participants before forwarding to the Global Telecommunications System for assimilation into global weather center model forecasts. DEEPWAVE measured GWs generated by orography, jet streams, frontal systems, deep convection, and secondary generation processes and spanned a range of forcing, propagation, and dissipation conditions. The various DEEPWAVE measurements led to the initial identification of a large number of anticipated research targets. Initial conclusions from our DEEPWAVE measurements include confirmation of the important roles of multiple sources of larger-scale large-amplitude GWs that readily penetrate to higher altitudes; the frequent refraction of larger-scale GWs into the polar vortex, including large-scale trailing MWs, the importance of environmental wind and temperature fields in defining their evolving characteristics and the altitudes to which they penetrate; and links between GW sources and characteristics at higher altitudes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)425-453
Number of pages29
JournalBulletin of the American Meteorological Society
Volume97
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

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