The cream of the crop? Geography, networks, and Irish migrant selection in the age of mass migration

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With more than 30 million people moving to North America during the Age of Mass Migration (1850-1913), governments feared that Europe was losing its most talented workers. Using new data from Ireland in the early twentieth century, I provide evidence to the contrary, showing that the sons of farmers and illiterate men were more likely to emigrate than their literate and skilled counterparts. Emigration rates were highest in poorer farming communities with stronger migrant networks. I constructed these data using new name-based techniques to follow people over time and to measure chain migration from origin communities to the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-175
Number of pages37
JournalJournal of Economic History
Volume79
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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Crops
Migrants
Geography
Ireland
20th century
Emigration
Farmers
Farming
Government
Workers
Names

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The cream of the crop? Geography, networks, and Irish migrant selection in the age of mass migration. / Connor, Dylan Shane.

In: Journal of Economic History, Vol. 79, No. 1, 01.03.2019, p. 139-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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