The contributions of 'hot' and 'cool' executive function to children's academic achievement, learning-related behaviors, and engagement in kindergarten

Laura L. Brock, Sara E. Rimm-Kaufman, Lori Nathanson, Kevin Grimm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

234 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Executive functioning (EF) refers to higher order thought processes considered foundational for problem-solving. EF has both 'cool' cognitive and 'hot' emotional components. This study asks: (a) what are the relative contributions of 'hot' and 'cool' EF to children's academic achievement? (b) What are the relative contributions of 'hot' and 'cool' EF to learning-related classroom behaviors and observed engagement? (c) Do learning-related classroom behaviors and observed engagement account for the relation between EF and achievement? For a sample of 173 kindergarteners, cool EF predicted math achievement, learning-related classroom behaviors, and observed engagement. Hot EF did not predict any achievement or behavior outcomes when examined concurrently with cool EF. Children's classroom behavior did not account for the relation between cool EF and math achievement, suggesting cool EF and math performance are directly associated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)337-349
Number of pages13
JournalEarly Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Executive Function
kindergarten
academic achievement
Learning
learning
classroom
Child Behavior

Keywords

  • Academic achievement
  • Engagement
  • Executive function
  • Kindergarten
  • Learning-related behavior
  • School readiness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

The contributions of 'hot' and 'cool' executive function to children's academic achievement, learning-related behaviors, and engagement in kindergarten. / Brock, Laura L.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Nathanson, Lori; Grimm, Kevin.

In: Early Childhood Research Quarterly, Vol. 24, No. 3, 09.2009, p. 337-349.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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