The Contribution of Extracurricular Activities to Adolescent Friendships

New Insights Through Social Network Analysis

David R. Schaefer, Sandra D. Simpkins, Andrea E. Vest, Chara D. Price

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extracurricular activities are settings that are theorized to help adolescents maintain existing friendships and develop new friendships. The overarching goal of the current investigation was to examine whether coparticipating in school-based extracurricular activities supported adolescents' school-based friendships. We used social network methods and data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to examine whether dyadic friendship ties were more likely to exist among activity coparticipants while controlling for alternative friendship processes, namely dyadic homophily (e.g., demographic and behavioral similarities) and network-level processes (e.g., triadic closure). Results provide strong evidence that activities were associated with current friendships and promoted the formation of new friendships. These associations varied based on school level (i.e., middle vs. high school) and activity type (i.e., sports, academic, arts). Results of this study provide new insight into the complex relations between activities and friendship that can inform theories of their developmental outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1141-1152
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

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network analysis
Social Support
friendship
social network
adolescent
school
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health
Art
Sports
longitudinal study
Demography
art
health
evidence

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Extracurricular activities
  • Friendships
  • Homophily
  • Social networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies
  • Demography

Cite this

The Contribution of Extracurricular Activities to Adolescent Friendships : New Insights Through Social Network Analysis. / Schaefer, David R.; Simpkins, Sandra D.; Vest, Andrea E.; Price, Chara D.

In: Developmental Psychology, Vol. 47, No. 4, 07.2011, p. 1141-1152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schaefer, David R. ; Simpkins, Sandra D. ; Vest, Andrea E. ; Price, Chara D. / The Contribution of Extracurricular Activities to Adolescent Friendships : New Insights Through Social Network Analysis. In: Developmental Psychology. 2011 ; Vol. 47, No. 4. pp. 1141-1152.
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