The cognitive basis of spontaneous imitation: Evidence from the visual world

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is well-established that, when people are asked to identify and quickly repeat spoken words, they show a strong tendency to spontaneously imitate the vocal and/or phonetic characteristics of the stimulus tokens. There is mixed evidence, however, regarding the underlying basis of such imitation: Does it only reflect gestural attunement (as in Direct Realism), or does it also reflect cognitive principles of word perception and memory? The gestural attunement view has face validity, as imitation seems to require tacit knowledge of other peoples' articulatory actions. The role of memory is less obvious, although people can certainly imitate others from memory. In this talk, I will present evidence from three new experiments, pairing procedures from the "visual world" paradigm with a speech production task. Across studies, there is clear evidence that degrees of speech imitation are tightly connected to attention and memory processes that were engaged during initial exposure to spoken words. The results show clear imitation (in naming depicted objects), both with and without spoken words prompting responses, and show strong effects of competition among visual objects: Imitation increases when other potential objects have similar names, or even similar appearances. Spontaneous imitation is both a gestural and a cognitive behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of Meetings on Acoustics
Volume19
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Event21st International Congress on Acoustics, ICA 2013 - 165th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America - Montreal, QC, Canada
Duration: Jun 2 2013Jun 7 2013

Other

Other21st International Congress on Acoustics, ICA 2013 - 165th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
CountryCanada
CityMontreal, QC
Period6/2/136/7/13

Fingerprint

naming
phonetics
stimuli
tendencies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

The cognitive basis of spontaneous imitation : Evidence from the visual world. / Goldinger, Stephen.

Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics. Vol. 19 2013. 060136.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Goldinger, S 2013, The cognitive basis of spontaneous imitation: Evidence from the visual world. in Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics. vol. 19, 060136, 21st International Congress on Acoustics, ICA 2013 - 165th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Montreal, QC, Canada, 6/2/13. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.4800039
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