The changing smoking environment for middle and high school students

1980-1983

Laurie Chassin, Clark Presson, Steven J. Sherman, John McGrew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cultural-historical changes in smoking prevalence and in smoking-related attitudes and beliefs were examined as part of a cohort-sequential study of 6th-to 12th-grade midwestern adolescents (N=8681) between 1980 and 1983. Smoking prevalence decreased over the 4 years for the younger cohorts and remained unchanged for high school students. Paradoxically, however, some specific beliefs and attitudes about smoking (including health beliefs) became less negative with time. It is suggested that continuing negative social beliefs about smoking are supporting declines in smoking prevalence among younger cohorts. Implications of these cultural-historical changes for smoking behavior and smoking control are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)581-593
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1987

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Smoking
Students
Behavior Control
Cohort Studies
Health

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • attitudes
  • health beliefs
  • smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

The changing smoking environment for middle and high school students : 1980-1983. / Chassin, Laurie; Presson, Clark; Sherman, Steven J.; McGrew, John.

In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 10, No. 6, 12.1987, p. 581-593.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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