The challenges and scope of theoretical biology

David C. Krakauer, James Collins, Douglas Erwin, Jessica C. Flack, Walter Fontana, Manfred Laubichler, Sonja J. Prohaska, Geoffrey B. West, Peter F. Stadler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Scientific theories seek to provide simple explanations for significant empirical regularities based on fundamental physical and mechanistic constraints. Biological theories have rarely reached a level of generality and predictive power comparable to physical theories. This discrepancy is explained through a combination of frozen accidents, environmental heterogeneity, and widespread non-linearities observed in adaptive processes. At the same time, model building has proven to be very successful when it comes to explaining and predicting the behavior of particular biological systems. In this respect biology resembles alternative model-rich frameworks, such as economics and engineering. In this paper we explore the prospects for general theories in biology, and suggest that these take inspiration not only from physics, but also from the information sciences. Future theoretical biology is likely to represent a hybrid of parsimonious reasoning and algorithmic or rule-based explanation. An open question is whether these new frameworks will remain transparent to human reason. In this context, we discuss the role of machine learning in the early stages of scientific discovery. We argue that evolutionary history is not only a source of uncertainty, but also provides the basis, through conserved traits, for very general explanations for biological regularities, and the prospect of unified theories of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-276
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Theoretical Biology
Volume276
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 7 2011

Fingerprint

Biology
Biological Sciences
information science
Information Science
Information science
artificial intelligence
Physics
Biological systems
physics
accidents
Uncertainty
Regularity
Accidents
Learning systems
engineering
Adaptive Processes
uncertainty
History
Economics
economics

Keywords

  • Computation
  • Model
  • Parsimony
  • Physics
  • Theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Applied Mathematics

Cite this

Krakauer, D. C., Collins, J., Erwin, D., Flack, J. C., Fontana, W., Laubichler, M., ... Stadler, P. F. (2011). The challenges and scope of theoretical biology. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 276(1), 269-276. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.01.051

The challenges and scope of theoretical biology. / Krakauer, David C.; Collins, James; Erwin, Douglas; Flack, Jessica C.; Fontana, Walter; Laubichler, Manfred; Prohaska, Sonja J.; West, Geoffrey B.; Stadler, Peter F.

In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, Vol. 276, No. 1, 07.05.2011, p. 269-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krakauer, DC, Collins, J, Erwin, D, Flack, JC, Fontana, W, Laubichler, M, Prohaska, SJ, West, GB & Stadler, PF 2011, 'The challenges and scope of theoretical biology', Journal of Theoretical Biology, vol. 276, no. 1, pp. 269-276. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.01.051
Krakauer, David C. ; Collins, James ; Erwin, Douglas ; Flack, Jessica C. ; Fontana, Walter ; Laubichler, Manfred ; Prohaska, Sonja J. ; West, Geoffrey B. ; Stadler, Peter F. / The challenges and scope of theoretical biology. In: Journal of Theoretical Biology. 2011 ; Vol. 276, No. 1. pp. 269-276.
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