The C. elegans 3' UTRome v2 resource for studying mRNA cleavage and polyadenylation, 3'-UTR biology, and miRNA targeting

Hannah S. Steber, Christina Gallante, Shannon O'Brien, Po Lin Chiu, Marco Mangone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

3' Untranslated regions (3' UTRs) of mRNAs emerged as central regulators of cellular function because they contain important but poorly characterized cis-regulatory elements targeted by a multitude of regulatory factors. The model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is ideal to study these interactions because it possesses a well-defined 3' UTRome. To improve its annotation, we have used a genome-wide bioinformatics approach to download raw transcriptome data for 1088 transcriptome data sets corresponding to the entire collection of C. elegans trancriptomes from 2015 to 2018 from the Sequence Read Archive at the NCBI. We then extracted and mapped high-quality 3'-UTR data at ultradeep coverage. Here, we describe and release to the community the updated version of the worm 3' UTRome, which we named 3' UTRome v2. This resource contains high-quality 3'-UTR data mapped at single-base ultraresolution for 23,084 3'-UTR isoform variants corresponding to 14,788 protein-coding genes and is updated to the latest release of WormBase. We used this data set to study and probe principles of mRNA cleavage and polyadenylation in C. elegans. The worm 3' UTRome v2 represents the most comprehensive and high-resolution 3'-UTR data set available in C. elegans and provides a novel resource to investigate the mRNA cleavage and polyadenylation reaction, 3'-UTR biology, and miRNA targeting in a living organism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2104-2116
Number of pages13
JournalGenome research
Volume29
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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