The body of knowledge in mechanical engineering technology

Scott Danielson, John R. Hartin

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    In November 2004, the ASME Council on Education promulgated a vision of the future of mechanical engineering education based on the work of the ASME Body of Knowledge Taskforce. Unfortunately, the vision gave only a cursory nod to Mechanical Engineering Technology (MET) as a part of the educational and professional spectrum. This paper presents an amended vision for the future of mechanical engineering technology education and a discussion of the body of knowledge as applied to engineering technology. A case is made for how the vision of the future for MET educational programs differs from mechanical engineering (ME) programs. In this, the relation of MET education to the practitioner and industry is a recurring theme. A vision is proposed speaking to the strength of MET graduates as engineering practitioners and as implementers of technology; job-ready, and focused on applied engineering. A discussion of the body of knowledge appropriate for an engineering practitioner and the impact of that perspective on mechanical engineering technology education is offered. The challenges facing MET as a result of the perceptions and misconceptions regarding its graduates and their strengths are discussed. Following the lead of the ASME vision for ME education, considerations for reshaping MET education are also proposed. A positive view of the strengths of an MET education is taken and a dialog is opened on the challenges facing MET education.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationInnovations in Engineering Education 2005: Mechanical Engineering Education, Mechanical Engineering Technology Department Heads
    Pages515-519
    Number of pages5
    Volume2005
    StatePublished - 2005
    Event2005 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2005 - Orlando, FL, United States
    Duration: Nov 5 2005Nov 11 2005

    Other

    Other2005 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2005
    CountryUnited States
    CityOrlando, FL
    Period11/5/0511/11/05

    Fingerprint

    Engineering technology
    Mechanical engineering
    Education
    Engineering education
    Lead

    Keywords

    • Accreditation
    • Body of knowledge
    • Mechanical engineering education
    • Mechanical engineering technology

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Engineering(all)

    Cite this

    Danielson, S., & Hartin, J. R. (2005). The body of knowledge in mechanical engineering technology. In Innovations in Engineering Education 2005: Mechanical Engineering Education, Mechanical Engineering Technology Department Heads (Vol. 2005, pp. 515-519)

    The body of knowledge in mechanical engineering technology. / Danielson, Scott; Hartin, John R.

    Innovations in Engineering Education 2005: Mechanical Engineering Education, Mechanical Engineering Technology Department Heads. Vol. 2005 2005. p. 515-519.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Danielson, S & Hartin, JR 2005, The body of knowledge in mechanical engineering technology. in Innovations in Engineering Education 2005: Mechanical Engineering Education, Mechanical Engineering Technology Department Heads. vol. 2005, pp. 515-519, 2005 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2005, Orlando, FL, United States, 11/5/05.
    Danielson S, Hartin JR. The body of knowledge in mechanical engineering technology. In Innovations in Engineering Education 2005: Mechanical Engineering Education, Mechanical Engineering Technology Department Heads. Vol. 2005. 2005. p. 515-519
    Danielson, Scott ; Hartin, John R. / The body of knowledge in mechanical engineering technology. Innovations in Engineering Education 2005: Mechanical Engineering Education, Mechanical Engineering Technology Department Heads. Vol. 2005 2005. pp. 515-519
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