The biogeochemical heterogeneity of tropical forests

Alan R. Townsend, Gregory P. Asner, Cory C. Cleveland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

178 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tropical forests are renowned for their biological diversity, but also harbor variable combinations of soil age, chemistry and susceptibility to erosion or tectonic uplift. Here we contend that the combined effects of this biotic and abiotic diversity promote exceptional biogeochemical heterogeneity at multiple scales. At local levels, high plant diversity creates variation in chemical and structural traits that affect plant production, decomposition and nutrient cycling. At regional levels, myriad combinations of soil age, soil chemistry and landscape dynamics create variation and uncertainty in limiting nutrients that do not exist at higher latitudes. The effects of such heterogeneity are not well captured in large-scale estimates of tropical ecosystem function, but we suggest new developments in remote sensing can help bridge the gap.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)424-431
Number of pages8
JournalTrends in Ecology and Evolution
Volume23
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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age of soil
tropical forests
tropical forest
soil chemistry
ecosystem function
nutrient cycling
biochemical polymorphism
harbor
soil
uplift
tectonics
decomposition
remote sensing
erosion
biogeochemical cycles
nutrient
chemistry
uncertainty
biodiversity
degradation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

The biogeochemical heterogeneity of tropical forests. / Townsend, Alan R.; Asner, Gregory P.; Cleveland, Cory C.

In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 23, No. 8, 01.08.2008, p. 424-431.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Townsend, Alan R. ; Asner, Gregory P. ; Cleveland, Cory C. / The biogeochemical heterogeneity of tropical forests. In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 2008 ; Vol. 23, No. 8. pp. 424-431.
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