The association between implicit and explicit attitudes toward smoking and support for tobacco control measures

Jonathan T. Macy, Laurie Chassin, Clark Presson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: This study examined the association between implicit and explicit attitudes towardsmoking and support for tobacco control policies. Methods: Participants were from an ongoing longitudinalstudy of the natural history of smoking who also completed a webbased assessment of implicit attitudes toward smoking (N = 1,337). Multiple regression was used to test the association between covariates (sex, age, educational attainment, parent status, and smoking status), implicit attitude towardsmoking, and explicit attitude toward smoking and support for tobacco control policies. The moderating effect of the covariates on the relation between attitudes and support for policies was also tested. Results: Females, those with higher educational attainment, parents, and nonsmokers expressed more support for tobacco control policy measures. For nonsmokers, only explicit attitude was significantly associated with support for policies. For smokers, both explicit and implicit attitudes were significantly associated with support. The effect of explicit attitude was stronger for those with lowereducational attainment. Conclusions: Both explicit and implicit smoking attitudes are important for building support for tobacco control policies, particularly among smokers. More research is needed on howto influence explicit and implicit attitudes to inform policy advocacy campaigns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-296
Number of pages6
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

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Smoking
Tobacco
Natural History
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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The association between implicit and explicit attitudes toward smoking and support for tobacco control measures. / Macy, Jonathan T.; Chassin, Laurie; Presson, Clark.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 15, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 291-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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