The age at which young deaf children receive cochlear implants and their vocabulary and speech-production growth: Is there an added value for early implantation?

Carol McDonald Connor, Holly K. Craig, Stephen W. Raudenbush, Krista Heavner, Teresa A. Zwolan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

252 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The age at which a child receives a cochlear implant seems to be one of the more important predictors of his or her speech and language outcomes. However, understanding the association between age at implantation and child outcomes is complex because a child's age, length of device use, and age at implantation are highly related. In this study, we investigate whether there is an added value to earlier implantation or whether advantages observed in child outcomes are primarily attributable to longer device use at any given age. DESIGN: Using hierarchical linear modeling, we examined latent-growth curves for 100 children who had received their implants when they were between 1 and 10 yr of age, had used oral communication, and had used their devices for between 1 and 12 yr. Children were divided into four groups based on age at implantation: between 1 and 2.5 yr, between 2.6 and 3.5 yr, between 3.6 and 7 yr, and between 7.1 and 10 yr. RESULTS: Investigation of growth curves and rates of growth over time revealed an additional value for earlier implantation over and above advantages attributable to longer length of use at any given age. Children who had received their implants before the age of 2.5 yr had exhibited early bursts of growth in consonant-production accuracy and vocabulary and also had significantly stronger outcomes compared with age peers who had received their implants at later ages. The magnitude of the early burst diminished systematically with increasing age at implantation and was not observed for children who were older than 7 yr at implantation for consonant-production accuracy or for children who were over 3.5 yr old at implantation for vocabulary. The impact of age at implantation on children's growth curves differed for speech production and vocabulary. CONCLUSIONS: There seems to be a substantial benefit for both speech and vocabulary outcomes when children receive their implant before the age of 2.5 yr. This benefit may combine a burst of growth after implantation with the impact of increased length of use at any given age. The added advantage (i.e., burst of growth) diminishes systematically with increasing age at implantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)628-644
Number of pages17
JournalEar and Hearing
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Cochlear Implants
Vocabulary
Growth
Equipment and Supplies
Language
Communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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The age at which young deaf children receive cochlear implants and their vocabulary and speech-production growth : Is there an added value for early implantation? / Connor, Carol McDonald; Craig, Holly K.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Heavner, Krista; Zwolan, Teresa A.

In: Ear and Hearing, Vol. 27, No. 6, 12.2006, p. 628-644.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Connor, Carol McDonald ; Craig, Holly K. ; Raudenbush, Stephen W. ; Heavner, Krista ; Zwolan, Teresa A. / The age at which young deaf children receive cochlear implants and their vocabulary and speech-production growth : Is there an added value for early implantation?. In: Ear and Hearing. 2006 ; Vol. 27, No. 6. pp. 628-644.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The age at which a child receives a cochlear implant seems to be one of the more important predictors of his or her speech and language outcomes. However, understanding the association between age at implantation and child outcomes is complex because a child's age, length of device use, and age at implantation are highly related. In this study, we investigate whether there is an added value to earlier implantation or whether advantages observed in child outcomes are primarily attributable to longer device use at any given age. DESIGN: Using hierarchical linear modeling, we examined latent-growth curves for 100 children who had received their implants when they were between 1 and 10 yr of age, had used oral communication, and had used their devices for between 1 and 12 yr. Children were divided into four groups based on age at implantation: between 1 and 2.5 yr, between 2.6 and 3.5 yr, between 3.6 and 7 yr, and between 7.1 and 10 yr. RESULTS: Investigation of growth curves and rates of growth over time revealed an additional value for earlier implantation over and above advantages attributable to longer length of use at any given age. Children who had received their implants before the age of 2.5 yr had exhibited early bursts of growth in consonant-production accuracy and vocabulary and also had significantly stronger outcomes compared with age peers who had received their implants at later ages. The magnitude of the early burst diminished systematically with increasing age at implantation and was not observed for children who were older than 7 yr at implantation for consonant-production accuracy or for children who were over 3.5 yr old at implantation for vocabulary. The impact of age at implantation on children's growth curves differed for speech production and vocabulary. CONCLUSIONS: There seems to be a substantial benefit for both speech and vocabulary outcomes when children receive their implant before the age of 2.5 yr. This benefit may combine a burst of growth after implantation with the impact of increased length of use at any given age. The added advantage (i.e., burst of growth) diminishes systematically with increasing age at implantation.",
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